Bitcoin Is Taking the Winklevoss Twins 'to the Moon'

Quantitative Hardening, Gold With Wings, and Freedom Money (AudioVisual Bitcoin Art Collection)

Quantitative Hardening, Gold With Wings, and Freedom Money (AudioVisual Bitcoin Art Collection)

Quantitative Hardening, Gold With Wings & Freedom Money by Lucho Poletti
My AudioVisual Bitcoin Art Collection, a milestone release for my art career, drops today (Sep 3rd).
AudioVisual Bitcoin Art (Collection Preview) by Lucho Poletti
For the drop on Nifty Gateway, there will be a total of 6 different NFT's (non-fungible tokens) in the collection. For each of the 3 pieces, there will be one full-length (1/1 auction) and one shorter version of the "money shot" of each. All 6 tokens are in video format with audio tracks.

Details for each of the 6 NFT's:

1) Quantitative Hardening:
Full animation with audio effects (1:03) walking through the history of Bitcoin's Monetary policy with individual animations for the 4 key events: Bitcoin Genesis, First Halving, Second Halving, Third Halving.
https://preview.redd.it/uro7uqc9lxk51.png?width=1280&format=png&auto=webp&s=d72e8aa070a3158af89c505c75a273dd5908c56e
https://preview.redd.it/46bikiqclxk51.png?width=1642&format=png&auto=webp&s=c5a387d2ed0fff0b0d391bf35f355204d85c4500
https://preview.redd.it/tijhce5glxk51.png?width=1322&format=png&auto=webp&s=145869a4615a8c238c5c7bdf2209f32c63be7c52
https://preview.redd.it/34qf3sidlxk51.png?width=1674&format=png&auto=webp&s=cfbff94f4dcde49289d2e358b6eee60521a1c7f1
https://preview.redd.it/nupqh47yxuk51.png?width=2016&format=png&auto=webp&s=b0b14397ad1eec9f87be09336db37c4482c1e853
https://preview.redd.it/l0on7sk3lxk51.png?width=2128&format=png&auto=webp&s=5fce8a311085163bb6f109da98695a433a6a6ad0
Quantitative Hardening (Preview) by Lucho Poletti
Read the blog post on Quantitative Hardening for more info on this piece.
2) Gold With Wings:
Full animation with audio effects (1:37) focused on the narrative of bitcoin as a better version of gold with individual animations for 4 characteristics of money where Bitcoin Outshines Gold (with quotes and a tribute to each of the Winklevoss Twins): Verifiability, Portability, Divisibility, Scarcity.

https://preview.redd.it/lqit0u8plxk51.png?width=1680&format=png&auto=webp&s=0058c8838b982c8c39ea7abb520a343db56320bd
https://preview.redd.it/1dxbxy0qlxk51.png?width=1618&format=png&auto=webp&s=f71fbbbdd6f5b7a44f8c4914fc98e36c6286f5d3
https://preview.redd.it/jg83eg7olxk51.png?width=1756&format=png&auto=webp&s=596babc7292b6b818248620d7516c90cdf991538
https://preview.redd.it/9mdba68tlxk51.png?width=485&format=png&auto=webp&s=740ec26e03436fb18730bfcc961654d7c0759ab8

https://preview.redd.it/azfaadoaevk51.png?width=1698&format=png&auto=webp&s=e69e46e5ea647061d4e3a0f110e781a5aa318d62
https://preview.redd.it/snfpa6oaevk51.png?width=2088&format=png&auto=webp&s=612600b27dec08fd584d253692bbb97f4a9f6916
https://preview.redd.it/c728x5oaevk51.png?width=1126&format=png&auto=webp&s=f9d75e41f7653169680314d5f497b9ec5a7c4302
Gold With Wings (Preview) by Lucho Poletti
Read the blog post on Gold With Wings for more info on this piece.

3) Freedom Money:
Full animation with audio effects (1:35) focused on bitcoin as a fundamental freedom for society with individual animations for 4 fundamental freedoms and their relation to bitcoin and bitcoin's history: Freedom of Speech, Press, Religion, and Money
https://preview.redd.it/9d7v0uqvlxk51.png?width=611&format=png&auto=webp&s=be3cf18f2336776eee2e811322b00851d19f01df
https://preview.redd.it/0q5eaxnwlxk51.png?width=616&format=png&auto=webp&s=478ee583e8a8f4582657a0290556db903b14a386
https://preview.redd.it/tm0a4w2xlxk51.png?width=774&format=png&auto=webp&s=fdd2bf7c83745134ec64883648a0f775689624e3

https://preview.redd.it/n1sfkssxlxk51.png?width=726&format=png&auto=webp&s=845792b6f02b6b0561f4982deaf943641fce6c7e
https://preview.redd.it/h8dgjyf6mxk51.png?width=623&format=png&auto=webp&s=5fb2c708852161f6f8b39ad29cb62c8e584fbd69
https://preview.redd.it/5v57gk45mxk51.png?width=932&format=png&auto=webp&s=834bdcf700d33dc3dac7031005bbf24832cd6661
Freedom Money (Preview) by Lucho Poletti
Read the blog post on Freedom Money for more info on this piece.

Freedom Money \"Money Shot\" Animation

Why did I title my milestone collection "AudioVisual Bitcoin Art"?

I will set the tone for my explanation here, with Merriam Webster's definition of "audiovisual": Definition of Audiovisual: designed to aid in learning or teaching by making use of both hearing and sight.
Since embarking on this mission to educate the masses about bitcoin using visual art, I have contemplated long and hard about how best to impact people with combinations of images and words.
I've studied the words and practices of experts in social psychology and propaganda from the likes of Gustave Le Bon, Edward Bernays, Friedrich Nietzsche, and others.
The voice of Gustave Le Bon, particularly seems to always ring in my head as I take particular creative decisions, at times when questioning whether or not a certain image may resonate with "the crowd"
"The imagination of the crowds … is impressed above all by images. … It is possible to evoke them through the judicious use of words and formulas*."*
So here is my formula:
3 pieces of art using the same structure, each with their own narrative, to propagate the base idea "bitcoin is better money" with different groups of people: 1) The fundamental/economically focused, 2) The risk averse/wealthy, and 3) individuals who highly value freedom.
4 key points for each of those narratives, animated with full audio tracks to create a more immersive viewing experience.
Repetition and Reinforcement of the over-arching phrases and easy-to-understand aspects of the entire message for each.
All 3 pieces will also be released on collector's edition prints via www.luchopoletti.com.
Each print will offer the audiovisual experience of the animation in an augmented reality layer via the artivive app.
submitted by HODL_CRYPTO to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Cryptocurrency Books You Must Read

Cryptocurrency Books You Must Read
When you go out into Internet space to look for some information on the crypto world, you may end up being confused and baffled. Suddenly, everyone’s an expert and each has something to say about it. Without a basic knowledge of the technology, your lack of knowledge may backfire on you one day if you get into the clingy paws of ICO internet scammers, so before you invest, it is important to learn some of the basics and fundamentals.
by StealthEX
Here is a heap of cryptocurrency books we recommend you to read to nurture your crypto side of the brain:

Digital Gold by Nathaniel Popper

In his shortlisted for the 2015 Financial Times and McKinsey business book of the year, Popper tells us the story of bitcoin since its early days. He tells the story through the eyes of famous and bright crypto influencers including South American and Asian millionaires, the Winklevoss twins and the legendary Satoshi Nakamoto. The author compares the digital currency to gold, claiming cryptocurrency to be the new global standard of storing the value.
Some readers say that Digital Gold book is a ready material for a thriller – unexpected plot twists, powerful influential organizations, drugs, blackmail make up the fascinating story to read and a really good starting point to understand what Bitcoin and Blockchain Technology is. The only downside that it only takes you up to 2015 but don’t worry, those were jam-packed years of growing.

The Internet of Money by Andreas Antonopoulos

Even though Andreas Antonopoulos is one of the world’s foremost bitcoin and blockchain experts, he has a unique talent to simply explain complicated materials herewith maintaining the significance of the topic. For readers who want to explore more theory, The Internet of Money book is actually a collection of talks given by technology-enthusiast Andreas Antonopoulos, where he surpasses all the technical “geeky” details. In each section he delivers complex discussions in average words, exploring the economic, political, social and philosophical sides of the technology that has forever affected our world.
By the way, the book was released in 3-volume series so you won’t miss out on any trivia.

The Little Bitcoin Book: Why Bitcoin Matters for Your Freedom, Finances, and Future by Alejandro Machado, Jimmy Song, Alena Vranova, Timi Ajiboye, Luis Buenaventura, Lily Liu, Alexander Lloyd, Alex Gladstein

Why does the price keep changing? Is Bitcoin worth investing my money into? How does it even have value? Why do people keep saying that it is the future of currency? The answers to all these questions you are going to find out in this book written by 8 experienced crypto experts. They finished it in just four days and they did well in accumulating their knowledge in a book format along with covering a lot of different questions and concerns around the digital currency. The book also explains how Bitcoin affects people’s freedom and opportunities. Also, there is a Q & A section with some of the most frequently asked questions about Bitcoin.

Cryptoassets: The Innovative Investor’s Guide to Bitcoin and Beyond by Chris Burniske & Jack Tatar

The book provides a useful framework on some popular cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, Litecoin, Ethereum, Ripple, etc. and also explains why and how to invest and what would be the best thing to invest into. The authors make a major focus on investment strategies that really work, and teach you on fundamental notions like volume, liquidity and volatility of crypto coins. The authors use infographics, equations, historical data and statistics to teach you about crypto assets and markets.
This crypto book is as suitable for the beginners as for the advanced investors. It’s written in a straight forward style and will probably serve as a good reference for the future.

Mastering Bitcoin: Programming the Open Blockchain by Andreas M. Antonopoulos

Another Andreas Antonopoulos book but at this time an intermediate level. If you want a technical explanation, with code samples – get this book, Mastering Bitcoin is for people who already have a programming or computer science background. Well-delivered, useful and enlightening – the book takes you through the intricate world of bitcoin, providing the knowledge you need to participate in the internet of money. Whether you’re a software developer, startup investor, or simply curious about the technology, this edition is definitely worth your attention!

The Bitcoin Standard: The Decentralized Alternative to Central Banking by Saifedean Ammous

This is a book written by a world-class economist Saifedean Ammous, where he explains how money works, why some money works better than the others and how monetary systems evolved throughout history – from ancient times to our days.
Some people call it an eye-opening book, which would make you overthink the concept of money in general. Anyway, the book certainly is thought-provoking and it might induce you to dive deeper into the crypto world. The author doesn’t try to predict the future of money but to widen our horizon, to understand the problem of our economic system, and see the possibility of having a decentralized alternative to central banking.

The Book Of Satoshi: The Collected Writings of Bitcoin Creator Satoshi Nakamoto by Phil Champagne

Have you ever wondered who stands behind the whole crypto industry? Who made it all possible? The fun thing is that nobody knows. All we know is the name – Satoshi Nakamoto. In his book, Champagne dives deeper into his mysterious personality and investigates who Nakamoto might be, whether it is one person or a group, and how it was possible for Nakamoto to create the game-changing Bitcoin while remaining completely anonymous. The book includes actual emails and internet posts by Nakamoto, presented in chronological order. Fine resource for anyone interested in Bitcoin, it gives insight into Satoshi’s thinking, and readers can look at Bitcoin from a whole new perspective!
And speaking of Bitcoin, if you need to exchange your BTC and many other coins, StealthEX is here for you. We provide a selection of more than 250 cryptocurrencies and constantly updating the list so that our customers will find a suitable option. Our service does not require registration and allows you to remain anonymous. Why don’t you check it out? Just go to StealthEX and follow these easy steps:
✔ Choose the pair and the amount for your exchange. For example ETH to BTC.
✔ Press the “Start exchange” button.
✔ Provide the recipient address to which the coins will be transferred.
✔ Move your cryptocurrency for the exchange.
✔ Receive your coins.
Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get StealthEX.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us via [email protected].
The views and opinions expressed here are solely those of the author. Every investment and trading move involves risk. You should conduct your own research when making a decision.
Original article was posted on https://stealthex.io/blog/2020/09/01/cryptocurrency-books-you-must-read/
submitted by Stealthex_io to StealthEX [link] [comments]

Winklevoss Brothers Say Bitcoin Could Reach $500K as the ‘Only’ Long-Term Inflation Hedge

Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, noted internet entrepreneurs and crypto billionaires, believe weakness in the U.S. financial system and other factors mean bitcoin could one day reach $500,000 per coin.
submitted by ami_nil1987 to DigitalCryptoWorld [link] [comments]

Winklevoss Brothers Say Bitcoin Could Reach $500K as the ‘Only’ Long-Term Inflation Hedge

Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, noted internet entrepreneurs and crypto billionaires, believe weakness in the U.S. financial system and other factors mean bitcoin could one day reach $500,000 per coin.
submitted by ami_nil1987 to airdropfactory [link] [comments]

A letter from the future about Bitcoin.

Well gee, this blew up.
Bitcoin should not be treated as an investment, it should be recognized as a speculative negative-sum game. The Bitcoin system currently consumes an estimated 3.6 billion dollar worth of electricity on an annualized basis, just to update the ledger that contains a record of everyone's transactions. This enormous consumption of electricity is indirectly paid for by people who invest their savings in Bitcoin, as a consequence, money is continually "leaking" from the system.
As a Bitcoin investor, you're paying for Chinese businesses to waste electricity by solving an abstract math problem that is designed to get continually more difficult. Besides ensuring that many people lose vast sums of money while a small minority of early adapters is enriched, Bitcoin causes tremendous ecological damage in an era when we should be focusing as a society on reducing our carbon emissions.
The Bitcoin developers responsible for updating the protocol appear to have no genuine intention to introduce code changes that reduce the ecological damage caused by Bitcoin mining, so my suggestion has to be to sell your Bitcoins, which indirectly has the effect of reducing the ecological damage caused by Bitcoin mining.
Theft and loss of coins are also enormous problems affecting Bitcoin, so although it is theoretically possible to store your coins in a safe manner, history has shown that a lot of people will simply lose their coins, further illustrating why Bitcoin is not a good investment option.
The other cryptocurrencies share most of Bitcoin's flaws (resource waste, no protection against theft or loss, vulnerable to market manipulation, etc), but most importantly, what sets cryptocurrencies apart from proper investments is that these coins don't produce anything. If you invest in a company, that company can use the money to deliver more products. If you buy, silver, gold, bitcoin or beanie babies, you're hoping someone else will come along one day and pay more money for it. History has shown that people who invest money in the stock market will generally end up witnessing much higher returns than people who buy gold.
With that said, I hope this story has entertained you and helped you recognize some of the problems our society would face if we ever witnessed widespread adaption of Bitcoin or similar digital currencies.
I am sending this message from the year 2025. Things are looking bleak here, and some of you will carry blood on your hands.
If you don't believe me, please move on, as I have no way of proving to you I'm really who I claim to be.
I don't want to waste any of your time, so I'm merely going to explain what happened.
On average, every year so far, the value of Bitcoin has increased by about a factor ten. From 0.1 dollar in 2010, to 1 dollar in 2011, to 10 dollar in 2012, to 100 dollar in 2013. From now on, there's a slight slowdown, as the value increased by a factor ten every two years, to 1,000 dollar in 2015, to 10,000 in 2017, 100,000 in 2019, and 1,000,000 in 2021. From here onwards, there's no good way of expressing its value in dollars, as the dollar is no longer used, nor is any central bank issued currency for that matter. There are two main forms of wealth in today's world. Land and cryptocurrency.
There are just over 19 million Bitcoin known to be used in the world today, as well as a few hundred thousand that were permanently lost, and we're still dealing with a population of just over 7 billion people today. On average, this means the average person owns just under 0.003 bitcoin. However, due to the unequal distribution of wealth in my world, the mean person owns just 0.001 bitcoin. That's right, most of you reading this today are rich. I personally live next to an annoying young man who logged into his old Reddit account two years ago and discovered that he received a tip of 0.01 Bitcoin back in 2013 for calling someone a "faggot" when he was a 16 year old boy. Upon making this discovery he bought an airline ticket, left his house without telling anyone anything and went to a Citadel.
"What is a Citadel?" you might wonder. Well, by the time Bitcoin became worth 1,000 dollar, services began to emerge for the "Bitcoin rich" to protect themselves as well as their wealth. It started with expensive safes, then began to include bodyguards, and today, "earlies" (our term for early adapters), as well as those rich whose wealth survived the "transition" live in isolated gated cities called Citadels, where most work is automated. Most such Citadels are born out of the fortification used to protect places where Bitcoin mining machines are located. The company known as ASICminer to you is known to me as a city where Mr. Friedman rules as a king.
In my world, soon to be your world, most governments no longer exist, as Bitcoin transactions are done anonymously and thus most governments can enforce no taxation on their citizens. Most of the success of Bitcoin is due to the fact that Bitcoin turned out to be an effective method to hide your wealth from the government. Whereas people entering "rogue states" like Luxemberg, Monaco and Liechtenstein were followed by unmanned drones to ensure that governments know who is hiding wealth, no such option was available to stop people from hiding their money in Bitcoin.
Governments tried to stay relevant in my society by buying Bitcoin, which just made the problem worse, by increasing the value of Bitcoin. Governments did so in secret of course, but my generation's "Snowdens" are in fact greedy government employees who transferred Bitcoin to their own private account, and escaped to anarchic places where no questions are asked as long as you can cough up some money.
The four institutions with the largest still accessible Bitcoin balance are believed to be as following:
-ASICminer - 50,000 Bitcoin
-The IMF's "currency stabilization fund" - 70,000 Bitcoin
-Government of Saudi Arabia - 110,000 Bitcoin
-The North Korean government - 180,000 Bitcoin
Economic growth today is about -2% per year. Why is this? If you own more than 0.01 Bitcoin, chances are you don't do anything with your money. There is no inflation, and thus no incentive to invest your money. Just like the medieval ages had no significant economic growth, as wealth was measured in gold, our society has no economic growth either, as people know their 0.01 Bitcoin will be enough to last them a lifetime. The fact that there are still new Bitcoin released is what prevents our world from collapse so far it seems, but people fear that the decline in inflation that will occur during the next block halving may further wreck our economy.
What happened to the Winklevoss twins? The Winklevoss twins were among the first to die. After seeing the enormous damage done to the fabric of society, terrorist movements emerged that sought to hunt down and murder anyone known to have a large balance of Bitcoin, or believed to be responsible in any way for the development of cryptocurrency. Ironically, these terrorist movements use Bitcoin to anonymously fund their operations.
Most people who own any significant amount of Bitcoin no longer speak to their families and lost their friends, because they had to change their identities. There have been also been a few suicides of people who could not handle the guilt after seeing what happened to the bag-holders, the type of skeptical people who continued to believe it would eventually collapse, even after hearing the rumors of governments buying Bitcoin. Many people were taken hostage, and thus, it is suspected that 25% percent of "Bitcoin rich" actually physically tortured someone to get him to spill his password.
Why didn't we abandon Bitcoin, and move to another system? Well, we tried of course. We tried to step over to an inflationary cryptocurrency, but nobody with an IQ above 70 was willing to step up first and volunteer. After all, why would you voluntarily invest a lot of your money into a currency where you know your wealth will continually decline? The thing that made Bitcoin so dangerous to society was also what made it so successful. Bitcoin allows us to give into our greed.
In Africa, surveys show that an estimated 70% of people believe that Bitcoin was invented by the devil himself. There's a reason for this. It's a very sensitive issue that today is generally referred to as "the tragedy". The African Union had ambitious plans to help its citizens be ready to step over to Bitcoin. Governments gave their own citizens cell phones for free, tied to their government ID, and thus government sought to integrate Bitcoin into their economy. All went well, until "the tragedy" that is. A criminal organization, believed to be located in Russia, exploited a hardware fault in the government issued cell phones. It's believed that the entire continent of Africa lost an estimated 60% of its wealth in a period of 48 hours. What followed was a period of chaos and civil war, until the Saudi Arabian and North Korean governments, two of the world's major superpowers due to their authoritarian political system's unique ability to adapt to the "Bitcoin challenge", divided most African land between themselves and were praised as heroes by the local African population for it.
You might wonder, what is our plan now? It's clear that the current situation can not be sustained, without ending in a nuclear holocaust. I am part of an underground network, who seek to launch a coordinated attack against the very infrastructure of the Internet itself. We have at our disposal about 20 nuclear submarines, which we will use to cut all underwater cables between different continents. After this has been successfully achieved, we will launch a simultaneous nuclear pulse attack on every densely population area of the world. We believe that the resulting chaos will allow the world's population to rise up in revolt, and destroy as many computers out there as possible, until we reach the point where Bitcoin loses any relevance.
Of course, this outcome will likely lead to billions of deaths. This is a price we are forced to pay, to avoid the eternal enslavement of humanity to a tiny elite.
This is also the reason we contacted you.
It doesn't have to be like this. You do not have to share our fate. I don't know how, but you must find a way to destroy this godforsaken project in its infancy. I know this is a difficult thing to ask of you. You believed you were helping the world by eliminating the central banking cartel that governs your economies.
However, I have seen where it ends.
More: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SgrUEHe7CZY&t=3s
submitted by chapikla to u/chapikla [link] [comments]

Top 10 Richest People in the World, in Bitcoin

Bitcoin has been given the nickname “digital gold”. This is because of its characteristic as a store of wealth. Many big investors are resorting to Bitcoin as a good place to put their money. The reason for this is not just because it can be sustained, but also because of the high tendency of appreciation in value. Here we shall be considering the top 10 richest people in the world, in Bitcoin.
We will take a look at their net worth, and how much that amounts to in Bitcoin. We will also consider their primary business and a little bit of their history. How they started out in the Bitcoin ecosystem and what they have achieved so far will also enable us to understand more about them.
So, here is a list of the top 10 richest people in the world, in Bitcoin.
10. Matthew Roszark
Matthew Roszark is the founder of Tally Capital, and co-founder of Bloq. Roszark is widely known as the man who gave Richard Branson and Bill Clinton their first Bitcoins. Roszark made it early into the Bitcoin space and participated in the very first ICO in 2013. Although that wasn’t what it was called at the time.
Roszark has investments in 20 startups in the cryptocurrency ecosystem, some of which have gone ahead to do great things. Some of the startups that he invested in include Coinbase, Kraken and BTCC.
Roszark’s net worth is $1 billion, which amounts to 102,712.94 BTC (at the time of writing).
  1. Anthony Di Iorio
Anthony Di lorio is the founder of Jaxx and Decentral, and co-founder at Ethereum. Having studied a bit of economics and trying to find out the true essence of money after the recession of early 2000, Di lorio discovered Bitcoin and decided to explore. He started a Toronto Bitcoin-meetup, where he met his eventual co-founder of Ethereum, Vitalik Buterin.
Di lorio contributed his personal funds towards the coding of Ethereum, and has since been involved in a number of other crypto assets. Some of them include Qtum, VeChain and ZCash.
Di lorio is a serial investor who commits to projects at an early stage, then after levelling up, he pulls his funds and moves on to something new. His net worth of $1 billion is the equivalent of 102,712.93 BTC.
  1. Michael Novogratz
This CEO of Galaxy Digital is also popular in the field of macro hedge fund management. Novogratz started investing in cryptocurrencies in 2013 and two years later he left his position at Fortress Investment Group to focus on crypto.
In the cryptocurrency industry, Novogratz is known as a seasoned trader who believes that the crypto market as it is today is a bubble. According to him, his aim is to make as much money as possible from the bubble before it bursts.
Novogratz is worth $1 billion which is the equivalent of 102,712.92 BTC
  1. Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss
The Winklevoss twins arrived in the face of the public through the controversial law suit against Facebook for intellectual property theft. They eventually won the case and were paid $11 million in compensation.
With many Silicon Valley startups not wanting to get into Facebook’s black book, the twins seemed to not have where to invest their money. They were introduced to Bitcoin by Brooklyn-based investor David Azar in 2012, and found their new investment ecosystem.
Over the years, the astronomic rise in Bitcoin price has turned their $11 million investment to a $1 billion portfolio of 102,712.91 BTC.
  1. Matthew Mellon
Matthew Mellon’s money started as old money which he inherited from family sources. However, through his “crazy” investment approach, he has been able to build a fortune out of his family inheritance.
Having bought into Bitcoin some years ago, Mellon abandoned his early investments and sold his Bitcoins at some point. His attachment with the banking industry and the XRP feasibility attracted him to the coin.
Mellon spent $2 million to acquire XRP tokens a few years back. That investment has grown to $1 billion, in the equivalence of 102,712.90 BTC.
  1. Zhao Chaopeng
Zhao Chaopeng popularly known as CZ, is the founder of cryptocurrency exchange, Binance. Within one year of its launch, Binance became the largest cryptocurrency exchange in terms of volume.
The platform’s tokens were sold at a price of 10 cents during its ICO. At the time of writing, the price of the coin has risen to over $27 and CZ owns a huge volume of the coins.
In 2014, CZ sold his house in Shanghai, which was practically all he had, to go all out into Bitcoin. Today, his net worth is $1.3 billion, which is equivalent to 133,523.65 BTC.
  1. Brian Armstrong
Brian Armstrong is the CEO of Coinbase, the largest cryptocurrency exchange in America. Coinbase was founded in 2012, and is the most patronized cryptocurrency exchange in the US. The exchange has also expanded, and is now available in many countries of the world.
In 2018, the exchange embarked on a financing round that saw it raise $300 million, and the company is now valued at $8 billion.
Armstrong’s net worth stands at $1.3 billion, with equates to 133,523.64 BTC.
  1. Jihan Wu
Johan Wu is the co-founder of Bitmain, a China-based Bitcoin mining giant. Together with Micree Zhan Ketuan, they have grown Bitmain to become a household name in the industry, and the main supplier of ASIC-chip miners. Wu is also popular for his open support of Bitcoin Cash.
Wu is estimated to be worth up to $1.5 billion, which translates in Bitcoin to 154,065.75 BTC.
  1. Chris Larsen
Chris Larsen is the co-founder of Ripple, a company which was founded in 2012 with Jed McCaleb, the founder of Mt Gox.
Larsen is regarded as a self-made billionaire, with the bulk of his wealth coming from cryptocurrency enterprises. Ripple boasts many top end customers in its portfolio. Among the list includes Bank of America, Santander and Mitsubishi Financial.
Larsen’s net worth is estimated at $1.5 billion, which is equivalent to 154,065.74 BTC.
  1. Micree Zhan Ketuan
Zhan is the co-founder of Bitmain technologies. Bitmain is regarded as the biggest Bitcoin mining company in China. The company is also known to specialize in the sale of ASIC-chip miners.
Zhan is an electrical engineer by training and is the builder of the ASIC chips on the Bitmain hardware. He is an acclaimed self-made billionaire whose source of wealth is the manufacturing and sales of cryptocurrency mining chips.
Zhan’s net worth is estimated at $2.7 billion, which when converted to Bitcoin is 215,692.05 BTC.
Conclusion
The dominant investment industry concept is evolutionary. At different eras of existence, different industries have produced different money magnates. Serial investors at the same time have found ways of aligning with the prevailing markets as the times change.
With the advent of Bitcoin and blockchain technology, the digital assets ecosystem appears to be making a strong statement in the wealth sector. The number of self made billionaires within this sector is a testimony to the impact of this concept in today’s world.
The top 10 richest people in the world, in Bitcoin, parades some names that can stand side-by-side with money magnates of traditional industries. With more developments likely to emerge in the crypto ecosystem, it will not be surprising to see the number of crypto-made billionaire skyrocket in the near future.
https://medium.com/@4kingsocials/top-10-richest-people-in-the-world-in-bitcoin-94183268189b
submitted by OliAustin101 to CryptoNewsandTalk [link] [comments]

Top 10 Richest People in the World, in Bitcoin

Bitcoin has been given the nickname “digital gold”. This is because of its characteristic as a store of wealth. Many big investors are resorting to Bitcoin as a good place to put their money. The reason for this is not just because it can be sustained, but also because of the high tendency of appreciation in value. Here we shall be considering the top 10 richest people in the world, in Bitcoin.
We will take a look at their net worth, and how much that amounts to in Bitcoin. We will also consider their primary business and a little bit of their history. How they started out in the Bitcoin ecosystem and what they have achieved so far will also enable us to understand more about them.
So, here is a list of the top 10 richest people in the world, in Bitcoin.
10. Matthew Roszark
Matthew Roszark is the founder of Tally Capital, and co-founder of Bloq. Roszark is widely known as the man who gave Richard Branson and Bill Clinton their first Bitcoins. Roszark made it early into the Bitcoin space and participated in the very first ICO in 2013. Although that wasn’t what it was called at the time.
Roszark has investments in 20 startups in the cryptocurrency ecosystem, some of which have gone ahead to do great things. Some of the startups that he invested in include Coinbase, Kraken and BTCC.
Roszark’s net worth is $1 billion, which amounts to 102,712.94 BTC (at the time of writing).
  1. Anthony Di Iorio
Anthony Di lorio is the founder of Jaxx and Decentral, and co-founder at Ethereum. Having studied a bit of economics and trying to find out the true essence of money after the recession of early 2000, Di lorio discovered Bitcoin and decided to explore. He started a Toronto Bitcoin-meetup, where he met his eventual co-founder of Ethereum, Vitalik Buterin.
Di lorio contributed his personal funds towards the coding of Ethereum, and has since been involved in a number of other crypto assets. Some of them include Qtum, VeChain and ZCash.
Di lorio is a serial investor who commits to projects at an early stage, then after levelling up, he pulls his funds and moves on to something new. His net worth of $1 billion is the equivalent of 102,712.93 BTC.
  1. Michael Novogratz
This CEO of Galaxy Digital is also popular in the field of macro hedge fund management. Novogratz started investing in cryptocurrencies in 2013 and two years later he left his position at Fortress Investment Group to focus on crypto.
In the cryptocurrency industry, Novogratz is known as a seasoned trader who believes that the crypto market as it is today is a bubble. According to him, his aim is to make as much money as possible from the bubble before it bursts.
Novogratz is worth $1 billion which is the equivalent of 102,712.92 BTC
  1. Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss
The Winklevoss twins arrived in the face of the public through the controversial law suit against Facebook for intellectual property theft. They eventually won the case and were paid $11 million in compensation.
With many Silicon Valley startups not wanting to get into Facebook’s black book, the twins seemed to not have where to invest their money. They were introduced to Bitcoin by Brooklyn-based investor David Azar in 2012, and found their new investment ecosystem.
Over the years, the astronomic rise in Bitcoin price has turned their $11 million investment to a $1 billion portfolio of 102,712.91 BTC.
  1. Matthew Mellon
Matthew Mellon’s money started as old money which he inherited from family sources. However, through his “crazy” investment approach, he has been able to build a fortune out of his family inheritance.
Having bought into Bitcoin some years ago, Mellon abandoned his early investments and sold his Bitcoins at some point. His attachment with the banking industry and the XRP feasibility attracted him to the coin.
Mellon spent $2 million to acquire XRP tokens a few years back. That investment has grown to $1 billion, in the equivalence of 102,712.90 BTC.
  1. Zhao Chaopeng
Zhao Chaopeng popularly known as CZ, is the founder of cryptocurrency exchange, Binance. Within one year of its launch, Binance became the largest cryptocurrency exchange in terms of volume.
The platform’s tokens were sold at a price of 10 cents during its ICO. At the time of writing, the price of the coin has risen to over $27 and CZ owns a huge volume of the coins.
In 2014, CZ sold his house in Shanghai, which was practically all he had, to go all out into Bitcoin. Today, his net worth is $1.3 billion, which is equivalent to 133,523.65 BTC.
  1. Brian Armstrong
Brian Armstrong is the CEO of Coinbase, the largest cryptocurrency exchange in America. Coinbase was founded in 2012, and is the most patronized cryptocurrency exchange in the US. The exchange has also expanded, and is now available in many countries of the world.
In 2018, the exchange embarked on a financing round that saw it raise $300 million, and the company is now valued at $8 billion.
Armstrong’s net worth stands at $1.3 billion, with equates to 133,523.64 BTC.
  1. Jihan Wu
Johan Wu is the co-founder of Bitmain, a China-based Bitcoin mining giant. Together with Micree Zhan Ketuan, they have grown Bitmain to become a household name in the industry, and the main supplier of ASIC-chip miners. Wu is also popular for his open support of Bitcoin Cash.
Wu is estimated to be worth up to $1.5 billion, which translates in Bitcoin to 154,065.75 BTC.
  1. Chris Larsen
Chris Larsen is the co-founder of Ripple, a company which was founded in 2012 with Jed McCaleb, the founder of Mt Gox.
Larsen is regarded as a self-made billionaire, with the bulk of his wealth coming from cryptocurrency enterprises. Ripple boasts many top end customers in its portfolio. Among the list includes Bank of America, Santander and Mitsubishi Financial.
Larsen’s net worth is estimated at $1.5 billion, which is equivalent to 154,065.74 BTC.
  1. Micree Zhan Ketuan
Zhan is the co-founder of Bitmain technologies. Bitmain is regarded as the biggest Bitcoin mining company in China. The company is also known to specialize in the sale of ASIC-chip miners.
Zhan is an electrical engineer by training and is the builder of the ASIC chips on the Bitmain hardware. He is an acclaimed self-made billionaire whose source of wealth is the manufacturing and sales of cryptocurrency mining chips.
Zhan’s net worth is estimated at $2.7 billion, which when converted to Bitcoin is 215,692.05 BTC.
Conclusion
The dominant investment industry concept is evolutionary. At different eras of existence, different industries have produced different money magnates. Serial investors at the same time have found ways of aligning with the prevailing markets as the times change.
With the advent of Bitcoin and blockchain technology, the digital assets ecosystem appears to be making a strong statement in the wealth sector. The number of self made billionaires within this sector is a testimony to the impact of this concept in today’s world.
The top 10 richest people in the world, in Bitcoin, parades some names that can stand side-by-side with money magnates of traditional industries. With more developments likely to emerge in the crypto ecosystem, it will not be surprising to see the number of crypto-made billionaire skyrocket in the near future.
https://medium.com/@4kingsocials/top-10-richest-people-in-the-world-in-bitcoin-94183268189b
submitted by OliAustin101 to CryptocurrencyToday [link] [comments]

I am a time-traveler from the future, here to beg you to stop what you are doing.

Update, 27 oktober 2019:
Well gee, this blew up.
Bitcoin should not be treated as an investment, it should be recognized as a speculative negative-sum game. The Bitcoin system currently consumes an estimated 3.6 billion dollar worth of electricity on an annualized basis, just to update the ledger that contains a record of everyone's transactions. This enormous consumption of electricity is indirectly paid for by people who invest their savings in Bitcoin, as a consequence, money is continually "leaking" from the system.
As a Bitcoin investor, you're paying for Chinese businesses to waste electricity by solving an abstract math problem that is designed to get continually more difficult. Besides ensuring that many people lose vast sums of money while a small minority of early adapters is enriched, Bitcoin causes tremendous ecological damage in an era when we should be focusing as a society on reducing our carbon emissions.
The Bitcoin developers responsible for updating the protocol appear to have no genuine intention to introduce code changes that reduce the ecological damage caused by Bitcoin mining, so my suggestion has to be to sell your Bitcoins, which indirectly has the effect of reducing the ecological damage caused by Bitcoin mining.
Theft and loss of coins are also enormous problems affecting Bitcoin, so although it is theoretically possible to store your coins in a safe manner, history has shown that a lot of people will simply lose their coins, further illustrating why Bitcoin is not a good investment option.
The other cryptocurrencies share most of Bitcoin's flaws (resource waste, no protection against theft or loss, vulnerable to market manipulation, etc), but most importantly, what sets cryptocurrencies apart from proper investments is that these coins don't produce anything. If you invest in a company, that company can use the money to deliver more products. If you buy, silver, gold, bitcoin or beanie babies, you're hoping someone else will come along one day and pay more money for it. History has shown that people who invest money in the stock market will generally end up witnessing much higher returns than people who buy gold.
With that said, I hope this story has entertained you and helped you recognize some of the problems our society would face if we ever witnessed widespread adaption of Bitcoin or similar digital currencies.
I am sending this message from the year 2025. Things are looking bleak here, and some of you will carry blood on your hands.
If you don't believe me, please move on, as I have no way of proving to you I'm really who I claim to be.
I don't want to waste any of your time, so I'm merely going to explain what happened.
On average, every year so far, the value of Bitcoin has increased by about a factor ten. From 0.1 dollar in 2010, to 1 dollar in 2011, to 10 dollar in 2012, to 100 dollar in 2013. From now on, there's a slight slowdown, as the value increased by a factor ten every two years, to 1,000 dollar in 2015, to 10,000 in 2017, 100,000 in 2019, and 1,000,000 in 2021. From here onwards, there's no good way of expressing its value in dollars, as the dollar is no longer used, nor is any central bank issued currency for that matter. There are two main forms of wealth in today's world. Land and cryptocurrency.
There are just over 19 million Bitcoin known to be used in the world today, as well as a few hundred thousand that were permanently lost, and we're still dealing with a population of just over 7 billion people today. On average, this means the average person owns just under 0.003 bitcoin. However, due to the unequal distribution of wealth in my world, the mean person owns just 0.001 bitcoin. That's right, most of you reading this today are rich. I personally live next to an annoying young man who logged into his old Reddit account two years ago and discovered that he received a tip of 0.01 Bitcoin back in 2013 for calling someone a "faggot" when he was a 16 year old boy. Upon making this discovery he bought an airline ticket, left his house without telling anyone anything and went to a Citadel.
"What is a Citadel?" you might wonder. Well, by the time Bitcoin became worth 1,000 dollar, services began to emerge for the "Bitcoin rich" to protect themselves as well as their wealth. It started with expensive safes, then began to include bodyguards, and today, "earlies" (our term for early adapters), as well as those rich whose wealth survived the "transition" live in isolated gated cities called Citadels, where most work is automated. Most such Citadels are born out of the fortification used to protect places where Bitcoin mining machines are located. The company known as ASICminer to you is known to me as a city where Mr. Friedman rules as a king.
In my world, soon to be your world, most governments no longer exist, as Bitcoin transactions are done anonymously and thus most governments can enforce no taxation on their citizens. Most of the success of Bitcoin is due to the fact that Bitcoin turned out to be an effective method to hide your wealth from the government. Whereas people entering "rogue states" like Luxemberg, Monaco and Liechtenstein were followed by unmanned drones to ensure that governments know who is hiding wealth, no such option was available to stop people from hiding their money in Bitcoin.
Governments tried to stay relevant in my society by buying Bitcoin, which just made the problem worse, by increasing the value of Bitcoin. Governments did so in secret of course, but my generation's "Snowdens" are in fact greedy government employees who transferred Bitcoin to their own private account, and escaped to anarchic places where no questions are asked as long as you can cough up some money.
The four institutions with the largest still accessible Bitcoin balance are believed to be as following:
-ASICminer - 50,000 Bitcoin
-The IMF's "currency stabilization fund" - 70,000 Bitcoin
-Government of Saudi Arabia - 110,000 Bitcoin
-The North Korean government - 180,000 Bitcoin
Economic growth today is about -2% per year. Why is this? If you own more than 0.01 Bitcoin, chances are you don't do anything with your money. There is no inflation, and thus no incentive to invest your money. Just like the medieval ages had no significant economic growth, as wealth was measured in gold, our society has no economic growth either, as people know their 0.01 Bitcoin will be enough to last them a lifetime. The fact that there are still new Bitcoin released is what prevents our world from collapse so far it seems, but people fear that the decline in inflation that will occur during the next block halving may further wreck our economy.
What happened to the Winklevoss twins? The Winklevoss twins were among the first to die. After seeing the enormous damage done to the fabric of society, terrorist movements emerged that sought to hunt down and murder anyone known to have a large balance of Bitcoin, or believed to be responsible in any way for the development of cryptocurrency. Ironically, these terrorist movements use Bitcoin to anonymously fund their operations.
Most people who own any significant amount of Bitcoin no longer speak to their families and lost their friends, because they had to change their identities. There have been also been a few suicides of people who could not handle the guilt after seeing what happened to the bag-holders, the type of skeptical people who continued to believe it would eventually collapse, even after hearing the rumors of governments buying Bitcoin. Many people were taken hostage, and thus, it is suspected that 25% percent of "Bitcoin rich" actually physically tortured someone to get him to spill his password.
Why didn't we abandon Bitcoin, and move to another system? Well, we tried of course. We tried to step over to an inflationary cryptocurrency, but nobody with an IQ above 70 was willing to step up first and volunteer. After all, why would you voluntarily invest a lot of your money into a currency where you know your wealth will continually decline? The thing that made Bitcoin so dangerous to society was also what made it so successful. Bitcoin allows us to give into our greed.
In Africa, surveys show that an estimated 70% of people believe that Bitcoin was invented by the devil himself. There's a reason for this. It's a very sensitive issue that today is generally referred to as "the tragedy". The African Union had ambitious plans to help its citizens be ready to step over to Bitcoin. Governments gave their own citizens cell phones for free, tied to their government ID, and thus government sought to integrate Bitcoin into their economy. All went well, until "the tragedy" that is. A criminal organization, believed to be located in Russia, exploited a hardware fault in the government issued cell phones. It's believed that the entire continent of Africa lost an estimated 60% of its wealth in a period of 48 hours. What followed was a period of chaos and civil war, until the Saudi Arabian and North Korean governments, two of the world's major superpowers due to their authoritarian political system's unique ability to adapt to the "Bitcoin challenge", divided most African land between themselves and were praised as heroes by the local African population for it.
You might wonder, what is our plan now? It's clear that the current situation can not be sustained, without ending in a nuclear holocaust. I am part of an underground network, who seek to launch a coordinated attack against the very infrastructure of the Internet itself. We have at our disposal about 20 nuclear submarines, which we will use to cut all underwater cables between different continents. After this has been successfully achieved, we will launch a simultaneous nuclear pulse attack on every densely population area of the world. We believe that the resulting chaos will allow the world's population to rise up in revolt, and destroy as many computers out there as possible, until we reach the point where Bitcoin loses any relevance.
Of course, this outcome will likely lead to billions of deaths. This is a price we are forced to pay, to avoid the eternal enslavement of humanity to a tiny elite.
This is also the reason we contacted you.
It doesn't have to be like this. You do not have to share our fate. I don't know how, but you must find a way to destroy this godforsaken project in its infancy. I know this is a difficult thing to ask of you. You believed you were helping the world by eliminating the central banking cartel that governs your economies.
However, I have seen where it ends.
submitted by Luka_Magnotta to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

DragonEx Roadshow Recap

DragonEx Roadshow Recap
In support of our new partnership, DragonEx Exchange invited Kambria Team members to participate in an exclusive online roadshow with both the DragonEx English and Chinese-speaking communities.
The event featured Kambria community managers Annie Wang (CH) and William Ryan (EN). Both sessions were focused and very active. Here is a recap of the conversation with William in the English channel; for clarity, the original text has been lightly edited for grammar and spelling.
Do you have any idea about Kambria? Today’s roadshow is mainly about Kambria’s project progress. and its future planning.
I understand the bulk of the conversation is going on in the DragonEx Chinese channel, but in case there are any English speakers here who are interested, we were recently listed on DragonEx. I met the team in May in New York City, and was very impressed with their professionalism. They are awesome people to know, and I am even more excited to now be working with DragonEx. They are a great exchange!
I wanna know, how is Kambria different from other AI projects?
Kambria is an open innovation platform designed to cut down and drastically reduce the time and cost it takes to innovate robotics, AI, and other frontier technologies. Kambria allows for innovators to collaborate on every aspect of the innovation process. So a company can host a bounty to utilize developers to help them build their ideas. This also allows for innovators to modularize their ideas and allow other innovators to utilize their work, and earn KAT in the process.
Can the Kambria project run without blockchain?
Kambria’s Open Innovation Platform is designed around the KAT token. It technically could work without a blockchain, but it likely would not because we all know that incentives are the basis for the work that most people do. So we use KAT to power the network, pay bounties, pay developers, companies, and innovators who contribute to the network.
The best way to achieve this is to use a decentralized blockchain with smart contracts. No one would contribute without incentives. That is the backbone to any healthy economy. That is why we believe we do need a token.
But how advanced is the project in terms of progress?
Currently, the features that we are focusing on are building out Github support to allow developers to import the githubs to build out the Kambria codebase, which will be utilized in the Kambria codebase, the backbone of the platform. Additionally, we are creating innovation hubs across the world that will allow roboticists and AI developers to come in and innovate new products.
What if a big company copies Kambria? Are there any barriers to competition?
There are currently no other companies who are doing what we are doing. Our platform encompasses every single aspect of the innovation process from concept, to design, to manufacturing, to sourcing materials, to production, to delivery. We will also not open source all of our intellectual property. Because of our experience with OhmniLabs, Kambria’s sister company, we have discovered ways to build robots using 3-D printing far cheaper than most have heard of.
Could you please introduce your team members to us?
Yes. My name is William, and I am the American Community Manager, and I have with me Annie Wang, who is our Chinese Community Manager.
Let me get you some info on the rest of the team. Let’s start with the top :)
Dr. Thuc Vu — Co-Founder & CEO — AI & Game Theory Dr. Thuc is a serial entrepreneur, with multiple company acquisitions, the last one by Google. He has deep expertise in game theory, tournament design and multi-agent systems. He earned his Ph.D. from Stanford and BS from Carnegie Mellon, both in computer science. Dr. Thuc is a social entrepreneur in Vietnam, involved in several community projects.
Dr. Thuc Vu, first of all, is just incredible to work with. He is the nicest man, but he’s also very talented. He is also a very generous person who sows back into the communities around him. He has created several foundations in the world to “give back” to people, including his very own VietSeeds Foundationin Vietnam that helps poor Vietnamese children get a great college education. He sold one of his companies to Google, and then created OhmniLabs, which is Kambria’s sister company. You can visit the OhmniLabs.com website for more information.
Here’s a pic of our founders with the OhmniLabs robot.
Our CTO, Jared Go, met Dr. Thuc Vu in college. They both attended Stanford University and Carnegie Mellon together.
Jared Go — Co-Founder & CTO — Robotics — Jared is an avid maker and roboticist, previously CTO and founding member at a networks startup. He has extensive experience in blockchain, AI, real-time graphics, VR, mechanical engineering and electrical engineering. Jared is a Stanford Graduate Fellow, and has a BS in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University.
Tingxi Tan — Co-Founder & CPO — Blockchain & Cloud Computing — Tingxi has a background in cloud computing, network infrastructure and distributed system design. He has been active in Crypto Investment since 2010. He was responsible for building the global scale cloud infrastructure at a networks startup. He graduated from MSc Computer Science U of Calgary and BSc Applied Math Western University.
Dr. Tra Vu — COO — Operations & Infrastructure — Tra has a background in Financial and Civil Engineering. She earned her Master’s in Financial Engineering and her PhD in Transportation Planning & Engineering from the NYU Tandon School of Engineering. Tra currently teaches at her alma mater and was responsible for leading her previous company in designing the first city-wide Transit Signal Priority system in New York City.
Tingxi, Dr. Tra Vu, and Jared are also just fantastic people to work with. The team is not only wildly talented, but also very pleasantly nice. It’s refreshing to see.
Is artificial intelligence a moral issue? How can I overcome this problem?
I believe it could be; however, it is up to us how we build such technologies. In our open collaboration system, everyone has the ability to solve this problem. If you want to solve it, you simply can participate in building it ethically.
Is the Kambria Innovation Platform open now in public?
Yes. The Open Innovation Platform was soft-launched in September 2018, and we are preparing for a full release this year. You can check out the platform here: https://app.kambria.io
I think artificial intelligence is a big trend: very good. Is there a potential market now? What are the plans for the Kambria project in the future?
AI is one of the fastest growing technologies in the frontier space. We already have hundreds of developers ready to begin working on the Kambria Open Innovation Platform, which is why we are so eager to finish our full launch of the platform, as well as our codebase. We are not far away. The full launch will be this year.
In addition, we are opening five innovation hubs across the globe, the first in Silicon Valley, California. We also working with major universities, including Stanford and Carnegie Mellon, to host hackathons in collaboration with the International Data Engineering and Science Association (IDEAS). Additionally, Thuc created the VietAI Alliance, which is dedicated solely to AI development. There will be several more of these that work with governments and universities in many different countries
I’m just a robotics engineer, but with no knowledge in Blockchain. How can I manage your platform? In our case, we have a team of robotics engineers and AI programmers, but they have no knowledge about Blockchain.
Follow up question: Do you have an infrastructure already in place?
The great news is that many roboticists such as yourself are not familiar with blockchain, and that’s OK! You don’t need to know how the engine of a car works in order to be able to drive it. It’s the same idea. Much of the blockchain underpinnings will be taken care of for you so that you can focus on innovation. Blockchain will primarily serve as the payment vehicle for bounties, services, and other functions on the network, such as staking coins, but the actual building of the product will be very familiar to you.
We do have an infrastructure ready and proven to be HIGHLY effective. Because of our experience with OhmniLabs, we have a “tried and true” method that we will allow other projects, such as yours, to utilize, and not just ours, but everyone else’s that uses our platform. It truly is open innovation for everyone.
I hope that the Kambria project will be carried forward in the future. I want to ask if the Kambria project is an artificial intelligence platform. Can Kambria help people with disabilities? They really need this project.
Yes!!! We love this. One of the verticals that we are focusing on is healthcare. Also, we build consumer robots, and robotic arms, which are very important for helping disabled people. It’s one of the use cases we are most passionate about. That is what robotics is for after all — making human life more comfortable and easier.
One of our robots (potentially) helped save an elderly woman’s life who had fallen. Her family was able to find her quickly and easily, preventing any further damage.
Is the Kambria Platform open now in public?
The platform is open to the public. Currently, you can vote for bounties, hackathons, buy robotic development kits, and explore the codebase, but there is much, much more coming in the short term this year. You may find it at https://app.kambria.io
Is Kambria currently based on ETH, and has Kambria considered the subsequent rise of the public chain.
Yes, we are based on ETH, but we are blockchain agnostic. If ETH, for any reason, cannot scale, we will look for a more functional chain.
Yes, ETH has been criticized for its slow processing speed. Has the Kambria project considered EOS?
We have considered EOS, and that would certainly be on our radar as one of the potential chains to move to, if necessary.
Could you tell us the history of Kambria, I am very interested in it!
Surely! Our founders started a robotics company in 2015. It was built upon the premise that to really accelerate adoption of robotics in the homes, a new type of company was needed. Being far away from home ourselves, they could relate to the need for affordable robots that bring families closer. So they set out to design robots with modular components, and utilize lean, toolless manufacture. To close the cost gap, they were ultra-focused on iteration speed. Reusability and integration were the cornerstones of their fabrication process, allowing for orders of magnitude, less capital spent, and a fraction of the development time.
Being able to foster an open collaborative ecosystem, where every contribution can easily be shared, manufactured, and implemented, will be revolutionary. Companies can benefit from the collective contribution from the community to build custom applications without having to employ teams of PhDs. End users can enjoy the higher quality of life potentially afforded by more available robot products and services. A combination of reduced costs, cutting-edge technologies, and swift delivery will spur rapid adoption of the Kambria platform by companies, developers, and manufacturers. This cycle of innovation will pave the way for the next wave of robots to provide immense value for people across the world.
Ohmni has achieved good results in the market, and the architecture behind it is indispensable. However, OhmniLabs development was not easy. Built from scratch, the establishment of laboratories, and the search for supply chain production, robotic startups was very difficult. In the difficult process of exploring Ohmni, an idea gradually formed: since there are so many barriers in the field of robot development, why not create an open platform where development, purchase, research, investment, and other needs coexist? It not only brings together talents from all sides but also promotes the development of robotics. In that thought proces, Kambria was born!
We named the platform Kambria, after the Cambrian Explosion, 500 million years ago, when an accelerated evolutionary rate gave rise to biodiversity and abundance. We believe this platform will be the catalyst for a similar explosion in intelligent robotics.
How many people are there in the Kambria project? Is there a blockchain related person?
Yes, our CPO is Tingxi Tan, has extensive knowledge in blockchain development. Additionally, we have a wide array of blockchain and full-stack developers. In total, our full-time staff is 20 people and growing. There are also many part-time employees as well! You can find most of them on our LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/kambria/
While we are technically a global company, our two main “home bases” are in Silicon Valley and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, where much of the team is from. OhmniLabs is also in Silicon Valley.
Our advisor list is also quite extensive. I will list them here:
Prof. Manuela Veloso — AI & Robotics — Manuela Veloso is the Herbert A. Simon University Professor in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. Professor Veloso will be the Robotics and AI judge on the Kambria platform.
Simon Seojoon Kim — HASHED — Simon Seojoon Kim is CEO and founding partner of Hashed, a leading crypto fund based in South Korea. He is a Blockchain evangelist and organizer of Hashed Lounge, a premier Blockchain Seoul meetup community.
Loi Luu — Kyber Network — Loi Luu is a researcher working on cryptocurrencies, smart contract security and distributed consensus algorithms. He is also a regular invited speaker at Bitcoin and Ethereum workshops such as DevCon2, EDCON. Loi believes in the force of the Ethereum and Blockchain technology.
Roger Lim — NEO Global Capital — Roger Lim is an experienced angel and blockchain investor. He is the Founding Partner of NEO Global Capital and an advisor for projects like Bluzelle, Qlink, CoinFi, Thekey, Tomocoin, 0Chain, Switcheo, Open Platform, and nOS.
Long Vuong — Tomochain — Long Vuong is CEO and founder of Tomochain, a public blockchain infrastructure providing an innovative solution to the scalability problem with the Ethereum blockchain. He is often invited as guest speaker of many reputable blockchain events around the globe. Long and Tomochain will also be partnering with Kambria to develop an educational certification program in blockchain and AI.
George Li — WeTrust — George is an ex-Googler who previously co-founded CottonBrew, a Stanford StartX computer vision company. George has helped connect us with influencers and market movers in the crypto space.
May I know some recent news about this project?
In addition to our new Innovation Hubs, we launched our KAT token in December. It is currently listed on DragonEx, KuCoin, and Bitmart Exchanges. We also recently hosted an incredible event this last November where the Winklevoss Twins, and Joe Lonsdale, and several other high-level venture capitalists were in attendance. I will get you the video! :D
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8y4MxyAvTc&feature=youtu.be — Enjoy! I know we did.
The Vietnamese government also attended our November event called Innovation, Community & Impact. It was a very big deal. We wrote several articles recapping the event if you’d like to read about it. I will drop the links from our latest post that contains all of our best top ten articles for last year.
https://medium.com/kambria-network/kambria-2018-beyond-9820242c86c1
Within that article, you can find a ton of information about our project.
Great, I hope that the Kambria project will be carried forward in the future.
Thank you! We want to change the world, and we are unique enough to do it. There is nothing in the world like Kambria. We aim to make frontier technologies WAY cheaper and easier to build. An estimated 85% percent of the work being done is considered to be “wasted effort.” Because much of the work is done in silos, that means almost everyone is doing “double work.”
We can modularize everything and allow the different pieces to be applied, thus saving a huge amount of time in the development process. Why create something from scratch when someone else has already perfected it?
Do you build great motors? AI logic? Robotic arms? You can allow others to use your innovations to build theirs, and earn KAT, promote innovation, get paid, and collaborate on a number of different ideas.
“We aim to make frontier technologies WAY cheaper and easier to build.” Yes, this sentence is very similar to what Xiaomi, the technology giant of our country said so that everyone can enjoy the fun of technology.
That’s what it's all about. Improving the quality of life so that we can focus on the more important things that life brings. Great questions by the way. You’ve been a pleasure to speak with this entire time.
We expect that you can change the world through artificial intelligence + blockchain. Thanks, William and Kambria.
You are very welcome. Please feel free to join our Telegram Channels. We do have a Chinese Channel as well. We’d love to see you there. I am going to post our channels. If you have any more questions, feel free to ping me or DM me directly. My inbox is always open.
We’d like to thank not only DragonEx Exchange for having us, but also to all of the community members who asked us such great questions!
[THE END]
About William
William Ryan is a part of the Global Kambria Community Manager Team, and a resident of Texas. He has been in blockchain since 2015, and has a strong passion for frontier technologies, including blockchain, robotics, and artificial intelligence.
The Kambria Team
Kambria Website
Kambria Whitepaper
Telegram (ENG) Telegram (KOR) Telegram (VIE)
Telegram (CHN) Telegram (RUS)
Medium (ENG) Medium (CHN)
Facebook Page Facebook Group
Reddit
Twitter
Steemit
Discord
Weibo (CHN)
Instagram
Email: [email protected]
KAT is a token to be used on the Kambria platform.
submitted by Freeme62410 to KambriaOfficial [link] [comments]

Blockchain is a Lie — Just Another World Run by the Rich ???

Blockchain is a Lie — Just Another World Run by the Rich ???

Blockchain is a Lie — Just Another World Run by the Rich


https://preview.redd.it/iutln8o0g1j21.jpg?width=706&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=09f1810ab6f679d61ec558dc1ef9089860cf8e52

Image: Bitcoin billionaires, The Winklevoss Twins

Follow the Money

More than just an alternative business model, blockchain represents ideology — a system in which the individual is no longer at the mercy of dominant institutions that control the flow of power, money, and data. If blockchain deteriorates into another world run by those who control the majority of the assets, it’s intent has been neglected and it has no reason to exist.

Within chains managed by Proof-of-Work and Delegated Proof-of-Stake consensus algorithms, this is the reality. Users tout decentralization, rights of the individual, abandoning banks and more, but then fall into a system promoting the very same values they are rebelling against.

PoW and DPoS are plutocracies in disguise. The former is at the mercy of firms that can afford the most hashing power, and the latter suppressed by those with the most currency.

Whoever can afford to mine the most controls the flow in PoW systems — there’s no room for the individual with a starter setup having a say. Either invest a years salary or get lost. In the DPoS system, the irony is even more baffling: the people with the most currency ultimately get to write history.

Is this still the blockchain world we want? Trading one system controlled by a ruling minority for another shouldn’t be in the discourse.

Steadying Blockchains Ideological Path

Blockchains growth will remain stunted unless the focus is shifted away from Proof-of-Work and Delegated Proof-of-Stake based consensus algorithms.

The November BCH hashing wars that produced two new chains via hard fork, BCHABC and BSV, left many speculating over governing issues within the PoW world. Differences in principles have made this side of the blockchain vulnerable — anyone with a large enough following is able to hold everyone else hostage. Chain sustainability isn’t guaranteed due to the ease in which conflicting parties can force a hard fork.

Those that preach DPoS put our future into the hands of 21 supernodes — corruption practically hard coded into the EOS genesis block. Everyone yearns for profit and power, making the have-nots pawns in the game controlled by those at the top.

https://preview.redd.it/rlr14523g1j21.png?width=990&format=png&auto=webp&s=7cf8205df04d39d94046c61b3fa942bf20689de7

A Blunt Account of Blockchain Management

Blockchain governance is defined as follows:

“The ways in which collective action can be achieved by public communities and key stakeholders — particularly those regarding the revision of past agreements. “

In view of the lack of a decentralized and de-identified digital platform supporting the “one person, one vote system”, the governance of the chain is often seen as a plutocracy — currency and computing power are king.

According to an article written by Vitalik Buterin, blockchain governance systems must be innately anti-plutocratic.

Not only is on-chain coin-based governance inconsistent with user interests, it is also antithetical to the ethos of public blockchains. The blockchain is for the public, to serve the public interest. It isn’t for cryptocurrency whales to get more rich. Cryptocurrency holdings (like wealth in global society) is highly concentrated in the hands of a very small number of people. The blockchain isn’t supposed to be owned by anyone… nevermind by a small group of super rich individuals. — Buterin

The interests of those who hold the wealth and those who actually use the blockchain are inherently different.

In theory, blockchain could provide an equal playing field where the world isn’t controlled by large institutions only acting for profit and belittling the rights of individuals. When power becomes concentrated by those holding the most currency or with the most hashing power, users who continue to praise these systems are working against their own interests.

The culture of blockchain implies egalitarian management. Anything else must be abandoned.

https://preview.redd.it/33cmf726g1j21.png?width=1170&format=png&auto=webp&s=6b013f14df05c987dedb4907b1f29fc338b1ecfc

Either we want it, or we don’t

The current state of blockchain is a farce. Either we want a new system where power is decentralized, or we don’t. Pushing the ethics of the centralized systems that have shaped our world for the worse within the blockchain space only perpetuates the virus that is elitism — sucking world of its resources and milking the chain for every satoshi it’s got.

The increased amount of ICOs in 2017 gave hope. Surely the competition would have promoted further developments — someone would have realised the bad traits trickling into blockchain- but only disappointment followed.

What should have been the start of a blockchain renaissance, turned into a money grabbing free-for-all, with scams, poorly designed products, and reckless teams becoming the norm.

But we do want it, we really do. We want the system as it was intended to be: quick, decentralized, egalitarian. A platform on which to build the next era of society.

This stepping stone comes in the form of Bitconch. Backed by Turing and Nobel laureates, offering 120,000TPS, anti-plutocratic governance, and an ecosystem based on egalitarian values, Bitconch has the speed, security, and morals needed warm the Crypto Winter.

Bitconch Solves the Issue of Governance

The Proof-of-Reputation (PoR) consensus algorithm developed by Bitconch creates a quantified reputation value (Bit-R) based on three dimensions: social behavior, currency holding time, and community contribution. Users with reputations within the top 5% then have an opportunity to take part in the consensus. This system more accurately mirrors the natural world — individuals who are more trustworthy, contribute to their communities, and build relationships with those around them are incentivised to continue doing so.

Money and the size of resources are no longer a consideration, which dissolves the power that the elite have over governing the chain and eliminates the possibility of bribery. Instead, there is room for devoted lower and middle class users to take part in the consensus, making the chain maintained by the people and for the people. The conflicting interests of currency holders and chain users, therefore, does not arise.

Reputation makes for a conscientious ecosystem and reduced conflicts of interest supports ecosystem sustainability.

https://preview.redd.it/2thjk0s7g1j21.png?width=2033&format=png&auto=webp&s=ea6d44f837959dd5bf57529ccc78d5a62699b731

Bitconch Solves the Speed Bottleneck

If the speed of the platform is not scaled to the needs of the users, usage will ultimately fall flat. A blockchain is meant to be used, and chains with slow speeds are simply not practical.

BLAZE (Bitconch Ledger Access Zero-delay Extension) allows for the simultaneous verification of multiple blocks through factoring the operation into five unique yet concurrent phases — fetching data, decoding, hashing, stating the change, and finally writing data. When BLAZE is coupled with PoR, the Bitconch platform offers 120,000TPS — making it a platform able to support extensive amounts of traffic.

https://preview.redd.it/1zgopb09g1j21.png?width=1064&format=png&auto=webp&s=311788e98e73dc56737f2c5be2a5dc89d30a749b

However, the current focus of the blockchain world should not be on pushing TPS speeds as high as possible. Developers and users alike have lost their way, once again falling victim to the very plutocracy that catalyzed the emergence of blockchain.

The ideology producing these platforms urges for the rights of the individual over the concentration of power in a few. It doesn’t matter if the flow of money is controlled by a few institutions in the current global economy or by a few mining firms in the blockchain world — once power is taken from the individual, we must dissolve the system.
submitted by dongchpp to BitConch [link] [comments]

02-27 04:53 - 'Blockchain is a Lie — Just Another World Run by the Rich ???' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/dongchpp removed from /r/Bitcoin within 0-6min

'''

Blockchain is a Lie — Just Another World Run by the Rich


[link]1

Image: Bitcoin billionaires, The Winklevoss Twins

Follow the Money

More than just an alternative business model, blockchain represents ideology — a system in which the individual is no longer at the mercy of dominant institutions that control the flow of power, money, and data. If blockchain deteriorates into another world run by those who control the majority of the assets, it’s intent has been neglected and it has no reason to exist.

Within chains managed by Proof-of-Work and Delegated Proof-of-Stake consensus algorithms, this is the reality. Users tout decentralization, rights of the individual, abandoning banks and more, but then fall into a system promoting the very same values they are rebelling against.

PoW and DPoS are plutocracies in disguise. The former is at the mercy of firms that can afford the most hashing power, and the latter suppressed by those with the most currency.

Whoever can afford to mine the most controls the flow in PoW systems — there’s no room for the individual with a starter setup having a say. Either invest a years salary or get lost. In the DPoS system, the irony is even more baffling: the people with the most currency ultimately get to write history.

Is this still the blockchain world we want? Trading one system controlled by a ruling minority for another shouldn’t be in the discourse.

Steadying Blockchains Ideological Path

Blockchains growth will remain stunted unless the focus is shifted away from Proof-of-Work and Delegated Proof-of-Stake based consensus algorithms.

The November BCH hashing wars that produced two new chains via hard fork, BCHABC and BSV, left many speculating over governing issues within the PoW world. Differences in principles have made this side of the blockchain vulnerable — anyone with a large enough following is able to hold everyone else hostage. Chain sustainability isn’t guaranteed due to the ease in which conflicting parties can force a hard fork.

Those that preach DPoS put our future into the hands of 21 supernodes — corruption practically hard coded into the EOS genesis block. Everyone yearns for profit and power, making the have-nots pawns in the game controlled by those at the top.

[link]2

A Blunt Account of Blockchain Management

Blockchain governance is defined as follows:

“The ways in which collective action can be achieved by public communities and key stakeholders — particularly those regarding the revision of past agreements. “

In view of the lack of a decentralized and de-identified digital platform supporting the “one person, one vote system”, the governance of the chain is often seen as a plutocracy — currency and computing power are king.

According to an article written by Vitalik Buterin, blockchain governance systems must be innately anti-plutocratic.

Not only is on-chain coin-based governance inconsistent with user interests, it is also antithetical to the ethos of public blockchains. The blockchain is for the public, to serve the public interest. It isn’t for cryptocurrency whales to get more rich. Cryptocurrency holdings (like wealth in global society) is highly concentrated in the hands of a very small number of people. The blockchain isn’t supposed to be owned by anyone… nevermind by a small group of super rich individuals. — Buterin

The interests of those who hold the wealth and those who actually use the blockchain are inherently different.

In theory, blockchain could provide an equal playing field where the world isn’t controlled by large institutions only acting for profit and belittling the rights of individuals. When power becomes concentrated by those holding the most currency or with the most hashing power, users who continue to praise these systems are working against their own interests.

The culture of blockchain implies egalitarian management. Anything else must be abandoned.

[link]3

Either we want it, or we don’t

The current state of blockchain is a farce. Either we want a new system where power is decentralized, or we don’t. Pushing the ethics of the centralized systems that have shaped our world for the worse within the blockchain space only perpetuates the virus that is elitism — sucking world of its resources and milking the chain for every satoshi it’s got.

The increased amount of ICOs in 2017 gave hope. Surely the competition would have promoted further developments — someone would have realised the bad traits trickling into blockchain- but only disappointment followed.

What should have been the start of a blockchain renaissance, turned into a money grabbing free-for-all, with scams, poorly designed products, and reckless teams becoming the norm.

But we do want it, we really do. We want the system as it was intended to be: quick, decentralized, egalitarian. A platform on which to build the next era of society.

This stepping stone comes in the form of Bitconch. Backed by Turing and Nobel laureates, offering 120,000TPS, anti-plutocratic governance, and an ecosystem based on egalitarian values, Bitconch has the speed, security, and morals needed warm the Crypto Winter.

Bitconch Solves the Issue of Governance

The Proof-of-Reputation (PoR) consensus algorithm developed by Bitconch creates a quantified reputation value (Bit-R) based on three dimensions: social behavior, currency holding time, and community contribution. Users with reputations within the top 5% then have an opportunity to take part in the consensus. This system more accurately mirrors the natural world — individuals who are more trustworthy, contribute to their communities, and build relationships with those around them are incentivised to continue doing so.

Money and the size of resources are no longer a consideration, which dissolves the power that the elite have over governing the chain and eliminates the possibility of bribery. Instead, there is room for devoted lower and middle class users to take part in the consensus, making the chain maintained by the people and for the people. The conflicting interests of currency holders and chain users, therefore, does not arise.

Reputation makes for a conscientious ecosystem and reduced conflicts of interest supports ecosystem sustainability.

[link]4

Bitconch Solves the Speed Bottleneck

If the speed of the platform is not scaled to the needs of the users, usage will ultimately fall flat. A blockchain is meant to be used, and chains with slow speeds are simply not practical.

BLAZE (Bitconch Ledger Access Zero-delay Extension) allows for the simultaneous verification of multiple blocks through factoring the operation into five unique yet concurrent phases — fetching data, decoding, hashing, stating the change, and finally writing data. When BLAZE is coupled with PoR, the Bitconch platform offers 120,000TPS — making it a platform able to support extensive amounts of traffic.

[link]5

However, the current focus of the blockchain world should not be on pushing TPS speeds as high as possible. Developers and users alike have lost their way, once again falling victim to the very plutocracy that catalyzed the emergence of blockchain.

The ideology producing these platforms urges for the rights of the individual over the concentration of power in a few. It doesn’t matter if the flow of money is controlled by a few institutions in the current global economy or by a few mining firms in the blockchain world — once power is taken from the individual, we must dissolve the system.
'''
Blockchain is a Lie — Just Another World Run by the Rich ???
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: dongchpp
1: i.redd**t/**lc*6ffg1j21*jp* 2: i**edd*it/l5cg*djjg*j*1.p*g 3: ****dd.it/ll**89kl*1j21.png 4: i.r***.it/92z*o21sg1*2*.p*g 5: i.*edd.*t*hsjrc0dtg1*21*p**
Unknown links are censored to prevent spreading illicit content.
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

5 Most Selling Books To Learn Bitcoin-easy for beginners.

5 Most Selling Books To Learn Bitcoin-easy for beginners.
5 Best Books About Bitcoin
Nathaniel Popper, a reporter at The New York Times who covers finance and technology, chronicles the history of the earliest bitcoin supporters in his 2015 book, including the stories of key players like the Winklevoss twins, Cameron and Tyler (who reportedly became the first "bitcoin billionaires" when the cryptocurrency's value breached $10,000 in November) and bitcoin's mysterious creator Satoshi Nakamoto.
"Bitcoin may be a product of computer science, but it is a very human story. ... This highly entertaining history reminds us yet again that truth can be stranger than fiction," former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers says of the book.
2. "Cryptoassets: The Innovative Investor's Guide to Bitcoin and Beyond" by Chris Burniske and Jack Tatar
Chris Burniske, partner at crypto-focused venture capital firm Placeholder Capital, and Jack Tatar, a frequent author on personal finance, published a "how-to" guide for investing in bitcoin and other digital assets. Their 2017 book discusses how to value cryptocurrencies, when to invest, and "tips to navigate inevitable bubbles and manias," according to the book's website.
"Informative and actionable, Cryptoassets is a must-read for crypto-enthusiasts and capital market investors alike," Arthur Laffer, a member of former President Ronald Reagan's Economic Policy Advisory Board, says of the book.
3. "Blockchain Revolution" by Don Tapscott and Alex Tapscott
Bitcoin uses a technology called blockchain, which is a digital ledger. (Check out CNBC's explainer here.) Blockchain experts Don Tapscott and Alex Tapscott explore how the technology could impact global systems in their 2016 book. The father and son pair co-founded the Blockchain Research Institute, a Canadian think tank with backing from companies like Microsoft, IBM, FedEx and PepsiCo. Forbes named Don Tapscott the second most influential business thinker in 2017.
"The Tapscotts have written the book, literally, on how to survive and thrive in this next wave of technology-driven disruption. Likely to become one of the iconic books of our time," says Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen.
4. "The Age of Cryptocurrency" by Paul Vigna and Michael J. Casey
Wall Street Journal reporters Paul Vigna and Michael J. Casey seek to explain how a world run on digital money would differ from today's system of tangible cash, banks, checkbooks, gold and credit cards in their 2015 book.
For example, the book's opening anecdote about a woman in Afghanistan with no bank account accessing money through cryptocurrency shows the kinds of change technology can bring, Fortunenotes in a review.
"Vigna and Casey's thorough, timely and colorful book is a rewarding place to learn about it all," according to a review in The New York Times.
5. "American Kingpin" by Nick Bilton
American Kingpin
This book tells the story of Ross Ulbricht, creator of the Silk Road, who built the dark web e-commerce site into a $1.2 billion platform for drugs, guns and anything else illegal.
One of Amazon's 100 Best Books of 2017, Apple's Best Book of 2017 and a New York Times "Editor's Choice" best-seller, bitcoin enthusiasts can read about the role cryptocurrency played. Nick Bilton is a special correspondent for Vanity Fair, a former reporter for The New York Times and a contributor to CNBC.
submitted by hexabond to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Manipulation Warning, Potential Advice, Studies, and Logic

Dear reader, I have been interested in the recent BTC sideways purchasing and selling that has lasted for days, which then results in a dip after 2-3 days. This pattern has been continually happening over the past few weeks and seemed relatively suspicious to me. After talking to many previous investors, friends, and family who have invested in other market booms (Silver, Stocks, ETC) Many confirmed the same thing and gave me the same advice for what to do with my money, BTC, and what I should do to gain a better understanding of the current market.
To start, I went online and perused the various markets and the buy/sell quantities that are leading to the dips and spikes. Looking at the first picture provided by, http://bitcoin-analytics.com/, a price history viewer, the past 24 hours have been filled with the same thing the past weeks have had. Low ball offers to try and find the bottom. TO BE CLEAR, this is NOT a lack of interest, but rather a sign of manipulation of the market where big money is being used to sell off at a higher price, and buy when it drops right after. The top Green circles' show larger dips that what is expected from the average seller and holder of BTC, where the value of BTC fluctuates down 12 Million $ in a matter of minutes on this one sight, which because of the respective prices across the market, can attribute to 6% of the value of BTC... which is extreme for any market, much less an individual. Unless the Winklevoss Twins started cashing out, which they could be doing to manipulate the value, leads me to the belief of either an organizational manipulation of the value.
Next, I looked at yearly corrections and when they take place. Every year, they occur in the spring interestingly enough. Provided is 2015-2018 when BTC was beginning to become popular.
After this, I talked to different investors from different fields. This is where every buyer should be aware of what I like to call the "Bear Case." Please, try and understand their point of view if you can. It's a pivotal piece of the BTC market, and shouldn't be underestimated.
Many Bears simply want out of the market. They have made enough profit to the point of comfort, to where they do not see the point in potentially losing more money. These investors who either independently invested or invested in the futures market. Without confidence they will make a profit, small or large, they simply want their money back. This leads to pressure on the future owners and investors to sell, sell, sell. The leaders of futures, corporations, and other individuals see the market rebounding right after the sell and see the opportunity to join them on selling short-term and rebuying right after which hurts the trust put into the new idea of an online currency.
This can be seen in the daily proclamations of Bitcoins death, doom and gloom, ETC that is published by editorials on random sites with little credibility or information of the publisher, much less their stake in the crypto game.
My advice, which I am following based on history, independent study, and logic lead me to the conclusion that BTC has to go up from here or fail. Miners are no longer making money on mining, BTC bears are taking over, and mainstream media coverage will kill bitcoin before it can be used as it was meant to be used; A virtual currency.
I will be purchasing more BTC, and recommend buying in the 6600-7100$ range, in light of what I consider to be a Bear Case overreaction and what I expect to be a price correction to 8000$ in the next 5 weeks, and upwards from there assuming BTC does not crash and burn.
I believe we need universal regulation or NO regulation at all to support the ability for minors, all adults, and all countries support this adoption of new technology. Without universal ability to BUY, SELL, and TRADE, BTC has no use. Either it needs to be able to be bought and sold anonymously, without any regulation, or it needs to be accepted everywhere without fluctuating prices to the point of unusability. This point can be up for discussion, and please leave a comment on your take on either the market or universal adoption!
I know the market is doing poorly, but if you thought my research is worth a tip, toss me a coin. I appreciate it but I don't expect, or believe in, charity or a free meal. Thanks for taking time from your day to read my "article."
BTC : 1NNMMLdWWGSjA1PtPfBqbNv85dxfrRpXDN LTC: Lb6oVHcwmvtkRr984rpSLC5ypMppHeSALD
All pictures are in a Google slideshow, Reddit seems to be limiting me to only one picture or video.
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/10UzCI7i0f8UIHJxUprWHLtJQvmcRqdjqgEXci4NAisA/edit?usp=sharing
submitted by Poozle01 to btc [link] [comments]

The SEC-Winklevoss News Recycling: FAKE FUD

The SEC-Winklevoss News Recycling: FAKE FUD

Image Source: Cointelegraph
In the past few days, we have seen a couple of internet news outlets and cryptocurrency websites recycling reports about the refusal of the US Securities and Exchange Commission to grant a regulatory approval for the launching of the Bitcoin Exchange-Traded Fund or Bitcoin ETF by the Winklevoss twins. This particular news was initially released in March of 2017. How come are we seeing the same news again after more than a year of its original release?
The cryptocurrency market is characterized by high volatility. Prices of bitcoin and altcoins can rise and drop according to existing market demand and supply. Investor speculations which are brought about by current news and regulatory updates also affect the movement of prices.
The recycling of the SEC-Winklevoss news can be considered as an attempt to bring down the price of Bitcoin after slowly recovering in the past weeks. We could easily remember that the same news in March 2017 has caused a significant drop in Bitcoin’s price from $1295 to $1000, which was a negative 22% change.
There was much confusion as to which ETF has been denied when the story came out again last week.
Recycling of negative news concerning the regulatory status of Bitcoin in world governments has the potential to gravely affect the Bitcoin and cryptocurrency prices. As years of market history has already proved, investor speculations and random news are among the primary movers of cryptocurrency values.
When a story comes out, be sure to pay attention to the details. Market manipulators use real stories out of context or with intentional facts omitted to control the market to their liking.
Original story from: https://roguecrypto.com/2018/07/30/the-sec-winklevoss-news-recycling-fake-fud/
submitted by knoll-ebitwork to u/knoll-ebitwork [link] [comments]

The wilkelvoss are trying to make bitcoin legit according to esquire magazine

Every idea needs a face, even if the faces are illusory simplifications. The country you get is the president you get. The Yankees you get is the shortstop you get. Apple needed Jobs. ISIS needs al-Baghdadi. The moon shot belongs to Bezos. There's nothing under the Facebook sun that doesn't come back to Zuckerberg.
But there is, as yet, no face behind the bitcoin curtain. It's the currency you've heard about but haven't been able to understand. Still to this day nobody knows who created it. For most people, it has something to do with programmable cash and algorithms and the deep space of mathematics, but it also has something to do with heroin and barbiturates and the sex trade and bankruptcies, too. It has no face because it doesn't seem tangible or real. We might align it with an anarchist's riot mask or a highly conceptualized question mark, but those images truncate its reality. Certain economists say it's as important as the birth of the Internet, that it's like discovering ice. Others are sure that it's doomed to melt. In the political sphere, it is the darling of the cypherpunks and libertarians. When they're not busy ignoring it, it scares the living shit out of the big banks and credit-card companies.
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW
It sparked to life in 2008—when all the financial world prepared for itself the articulate noose—and it knocked on the door like some inconvenient relative arriving at the dinner party in muddy shoes and a knit hat. Fierce ideological battles are currently being waged among the people who own and shepherd the currency. Some shout, Ponzi scheme. Some shout, Gold dust. Bitcoin alone is worth billions of dollars, but the computational structure behind it—its blockchain and its sidechains—could become the absolute underpinning of the world's financial structure for decades to come.
What bitcoin has needed for years is a face to legitimize it, sanitize it, make it palpable to all the naysayers. But it has no Larry Ellison, no Elon Musk, no noticeable visionaries either with or without the truth. There's a lot of ideology at stake. A lot of principle and dogma and creed. And an awful lot of cash, too.
At 6:00 on a Wednesday winter morning, three months after launching Gemini, their bitcoin exchange, Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss step out onto Broadway in New York, wearing the same make of sneakers, the same type of shorts, their baseball caps turned backward. They don't quite fall into the absolute caricature of twindom: They wear different-colored tops. Still, it's difficult to tell them apart, where Tyler ends and Cameron begins. Their faces are sculpted from another era, as if they had stepped from the ruin of one of Gatsby's parties. Their eyes are quick and seldom land on anything for long. Now thirty-four, there is something boyishly earnest about them as they jog down Prince Street, braiding in and out of each other, taking turns talking, as if they were working in shifts, drafting off each other.
Forget, for a moment, the four things the Winklevosses are most known for: suing Mark Zuckerberg, their portrayal in The Social Network, rowing in the Beijing Olympics, and their overwhelming public twinness. Because the Winklevoss brothers are betting just about everything—including their past—on a fifth thing: They want to shake the soul of money out.
At the deep end of their lives, they are athletes. Rowers. Full stop. And the thing about rowing—which might also be the thing about bitcoin—is that it's just about impossible to get your brain around its complexity. Everyone thinks you're going to a picnic. They have this notion you're out catching butterflies. They might ask you if you've got your little boater's hat ready. But it's not like that at all. You're fifteen years old. You rise in the dark. You drag your carcass along the railroad tracks before dawn. The boathouse keys are cold to the touch. You undo the ropes. You carry a shell down to the river. The carbon fiber rips at your hands. You place the boat in the water. You slip the oars in the locks. You wait for your coach. Nothing more than a thumb of light in the sky. It's still cold and the river stinks. That heron hasn't moved since yesterday. You hear Coach's voice before you see him. On you go, lads. You start at a dead sprint. The left rib's a little sore, but you don't say a thing. You are all power and no weight. The first push-to-pull in the water is a ripping surprise. From the legs first. Through the whole body. The arc. Atomic balance. A calm waiting for the burst. Your chest burns, your thighs scald, your brain blanks. It feels as if your rib cage might shatter. You are stillness exploding. You catch the water almost without breaking the surface. Coach says something about the pole vault. You like him. You really do. That brogue of his. Lads this, lads that. Fire. Stamina. Pain. After two dozen strokes, it already feels like you're hitting the wall. All that glycogen gone. Nobody knows. Nobody. They can't even pronounce it. Rowing. Ro-wing. Roh-ing. You push again, then pull. You feel as if you are breaking branch after branch off the bottom of your feet. You don't rock. You don't jolt. Keep it steady. Left, right, left, right. The heron stays still. This river. You see it every day. Nothing behind you. Everything in front. You cross the line. You know the exact tree. Your chest explodes. Your knees are trembling. This is the way the world will end, not with a whimper but a bang. You lean over the side of the boat. Up it comes, the breakfast you almost didn't have. A sign of respect to the river. You lay back. Ah, blue sky. Some cloud. Some gray. Do it again, lads. Yes, sir. You row so hard you puke it up once more. And here comes the heron, it's moving now, over the water, here it comes, look at that thing glide.
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW
The Winklevoss twins in the men's pair final during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. GETTY There's plenty of gin and beer and whiskey in the Harrison Room in downtown Manhattan, but the Winklevoss brothers sip Coca-Cola. The room, one of many in the newly renovated Pier A restaurant, is all mahogany and lamplight. It is, in essence, a floating bar, jutting four hundred feet out into the Hudson River. From the window you can see the Statue of Liberty. It feels entirely like their sort of room, a Jazz Age expectation hovering around their initial appearance—tall, imposing, the hair mannered, the collars of their shirts slightly tilted—but then they just slide into their seats, tentative, polite, even introverted.
They came here by subway early on a Friday evening, and they lean back in their seats, a little wary, their eyes busy—as if they want to look beyond the rehearsal of their words.
They had the curse of privilege, but, as they're keen to note, a curse that was earned. Their father worked to pay his way at a tiny college in backwoods Pennsylvania coal country. He escaped the small mining town and made it all the way to a professorship at Wharton. He founded his own company and eventually created the comfortable upper-middle-class family that came with it. They were raised in Greenwich, Connecticut, the most housebroken town on the planet. They might have looked like the others in their ZIP code, and dressed like them, spoke like them, but they didn't quite feel like them. Some nagging feeling—close to anger, close to fear—lodged itself beneath their shoulders, not quite a chip but an ache. They wanted Harvard but weren't quite sure what could get them there. "You have to be basically the best in the world at something if you're coming from Greenwich," says Tyler. "Otherwise it's like, great, you have a 1600 SAT, you and ten thousand others, so what?"
The rowing was a means to an end, but there was also something about the boat that they felt allowed another balance between them. They pulled their way through high school, Cameron on the port-side oar, Tyler on the starboard. They got to Harvard. The Square was theirs. They rowed their way to the national championships—twice. They went to Oxford. They competed in the Beijing Olympics. They sucked up the smog. They came in sixth place. The cameras loved them. Girls, too. They were so American, sandy-haired, blue-eyed, they could have been cast in a John Cougar Mellencamp song.
It might all have been so clean-cut and whitebread except for the fact that—at one of the turns in the river—they got involved in the most public brawl in the whole of the Internet's nascent history.
They don't talk about it much anymore, but they know that it still defines them, not so much in their own minds but in the minds of others. The story seems simple on one level, but nothing is ever simple, not even simplification. Theirs was the original idea for the first social network, Harvard Connection. They hired Mark Zuckerberg to build it. Instead he went off and created Facebook. They sued him. They settled for $65 million. It was a world of public spats and private anguish. Rumors and recriminations. A few years later, dusty old pre-Facebook text messages were leaked online by Silicon Alley Insider: "Yeah, I'm going to fuck them," wrote Zuckerberg to a friend. "Probably in the ear." The twins got their money, but then they believed they were duped again by an unfairly low evaluation of their stock. They began a second round of lawsuits for $180 million. There was even talk about the Supreme Court. It reeked of opportunism. But they wouldn't let it go. In interviews, they came across as insolent and splenetic, tossing their rattles out of the pram. It wasn't about the money, they said at the time, it was about fairness, reality, justice. Most people thought it was about some further agile fuckery, this time in Zuckerberg's ear.
There are many ways to tell the story, but perhaps the most penetrating version is that they weren't screwed so much by Zuckerberg as they were by their eventual portrayal in the film version of their lives. They appeared querulous and sulky, exactly the type of characters that America, peeling off the third-degree burns of the great recession, needed to hate. While the rest of the country worried about mounting debt and vanishing jobs, they were out there drinking champagne from, at the very least, Manolo stilettos. The truth would never get in the way of a good story. In Aaron Sorkin's world, and on just about every Web site, the blueblood trust-fund boys got what was coming to them. And the best thing now was for them to take their Facebook money and turn the corner, quickly, away, down toward whatever river would whisk them away.
Armie Hammer brilliantly portrayed them as the bluest of bloods in The Social Network. When the twins are questioned about those times now, they lean back a little in their seats, as if they've just lost a long race, a little perplexed that they came off as the victims of Hollywood's ability to throw an image, while the whole rip-roaring regatta still goes on behind them. "They put us in a box," says Cameron, "caricatured to a point where we didn't really exist." He glances around the bar, drums his finger against the glass. "That's fair enough. I understand that impulse." They smart a little when they hear Zuckerberg's name. "I don't think Mark liked being called an asshole," says Tyler, with a flick of bluster in his eyes, but then he catches himself. "You know, maybe Mark doesn't care. He's a bit of a statesman now, out there connecting the world. I have nothing against him. He's a smart guy."
These are men who've been taught, or have finally taught themselves, to tell their story rather than be told by it. But underneath the calm—just like underneath the boat—one can sense the churn.
They say the word—ath-letes—as if it were a country where pain is the passport. One of the things the brothers mention over and over again is that you can spontaneously crack a rib while rowing, just from the sheer exertion of the muscles hauling on the rib cage.
Along came bitcoin.
At its most elemental, bitcoin is a virtual currency. It's the sort of thing a five-year-old can understand—It's just e-cash, Mom—until he reaches eighteen and he begins to question the deep future of what money really means. It is a currency without government. It doesn't need a banker. It doesn't need a bank. It doesn't even need a brick to be built upon. Its supporters say that it bypasses the Man. It is less than a decade old and it has already come through its own Wild West, a story rooted in uncharted digital territory, up from the dust, an evening redness in the arithmetical West.
These are men who've been taught, or have finally taught themselves, to tell their story rather than be told by it. Bitcoin appeared in 2008—westward ho!—a little dot on the horizon of the Internet. It was the brainchild of a computer scientist named Satoshi Nakamoto. The first sting in the tale is that—to this very day—nobody knows who Nakamoto is, where he lives, or how much of his own invention he actually owns. He could be Californian, he could be Australian, he could even be a European conglomerate, but it doesn't really matter, since what he created was a cryptographic system that is borderless and supposedly unbreakable.
In the beginning the currency was ridiculed and scorned. It was money created from ones and zeros. You either bought it or you had to "mine" for it. If you were mining, your computer was your shovel. Any nerd could do it. You keyed your way in. By using your computer to help check and confirm the bitcoin transactions of others, you made coin. Everyone in this together. The computer heated up and mined, down down down, into the mathematical ground, lifting up numbers, making and breaking camp every hour or so until you had your saddlebags full of virtual coin. It all seemed a bit of a lark at first. No sheriff, no deputy, no central bank. The only saloon was a geeky chat room where a few dozen bitcoiners gathered to chew data.
Lest we forget, money was filthy in 2008.
The collapse was coming. The banks were shorting out. The real estate market was a confederacy of dunces. Bernie Madoff's shadow loomed. Occupy was on the horizon. And all those Wall Street yahoos were beginning to squirm.
Along came bitcoin like some Jesse James of the financial imagination. It was the biggest disruption of money since coins. Here was an idea that could revolutionize the financial world. A communal articulation of a new era. Fuck American Express. Fuck Western Union. Fuck Visa. Fuck the Fed. Fuck the Treasury. Fuck the deregulated thievery of the twenty-first century.
To the earliest settlers, bitcoin suggested a moral way out. It was a money created from the ground up, a currency of the people, by the people, for the people, with all government control extinguished. It was built on a solid base of blockchain technology where everyone participated in the protection of the code. It attracted anarchists, libertarians, whistle-blowers, cypherpunks, economists, extropians, geeks, upstairs, downstairs, left-wing, right-wing. Sure, it could be used by businesses and corporations, but it could also be used by poor people and immigrants to send money home, instantly, honestly, anonymously, without charge, with a click of the keyboard. Everyone in the world had access to your transaction, but nobody had to know your name. It bypassed the suits. All you needed to move money was a phone or a computer. It was freedom of economic action, a sort of anarchy at its democratic best, no rulers, just rules.
Bitcoin, to the original explorers, was a safe pass through the government-occupied valleys: Those assholes were up there in the hills, but they didn't have any scopes on their rifles, and besides, bitcoin went through in communal wagons at night.
Ordinary punters took a shot. Businesses, too. You could buy silk ties in Paris without any extra bank charges. You could protect your money in Buenos Aires without fear of a government grab.
The Winklevoss twins leave the U.S. Court of Appeals in 2011, after appearing in court to ask that the previous settlement case against Facebook be voided. GETTY But freedom can corrupt as surely as power. It was soon the currency that paid for everything illegal under the sun, the go-to money of the darknet. The westward ho! became the outlaw territory of Silk Road and beyond. Heroin through the mail. Cocaine at your doorstep. Child porn at a click. What better way for terrorists to ship money across the world than through a network of anonymous computers? Hezbollah, the Taliban, the Mexican cartels. In Central America, kidnappers began demanding ransom in bitcoin—there was no need for the cash to be stashed under a park bench anymore. Now everything could travel down the wire. Grab, gag, and collect. Uranium could be paid for in bitcoin. People, too. The sex trade was turned on: It was a perfect currency for Madame X. For the online gambling sites, bitcoin was pure jackpot.
For a while, things got very shady indeed. Over a couple years, the rate pinballed between $10 and $1,200 per bitcoin, causing massive waves and troughs of online panic and greed. (In recent times, it has begun to stabilize between $350 and $450.) In 2014, it was revealed that hackers had gotten into the hot wallet of Mt. Gox, a bitcoin exchange based in Tokyo. A total of 850,000 coins were "lost," at an estimated value of almost half a billion dollars. The founder of Silk Road, Ross William Ulbricht (known as "Dread Pirate Roberts"), got himself a four-by-six room in a federal penitentiary for life, not to mention pending charges for murder-for-hire in Maryland.
Everyone thought that bitcoin was the problem. The fact of the matter was, as it so often is, human nature was the problem. Money means desire. Desire means temptation. Temptation means that people get hurt.
During the first Gold Rush in the late 1840s, the belief was that all you needed was a pan and a decent pair of boots and a good dose of nerve and you could go out and make yourself a riverbed millionaire. Even Jack London later fell for the lure of it alongside thousands of others: the western test of manhood and the promise of wealth. What they soon found out was that a single egg could cost twenty-five of today's dollars, a pound of coffee went for a hundred, and a night in a whorehouse could set you back $6,000.
A few miners hit pay dirt, but what most ended up with for their troubles was a busted body and a nasty dose of syphilis.
The gold was discovered on the property of John Sutter in Sacramento, but the one who made the real cash was a neighboring merchant, Samuel Brannan. When Brannan heard the news of the gold nuggets, he bought up all the pickaxes and shovels he could find, filled a quinine bottle with gold dust, and went to San Francisco. Word went around like a prayer in a flash flood: gold gold gold. Brannan didn't wildcat for gold himself, but at the peak of the rush he was flogging $5,000 worth of shovels a day—that's $155,000 today—and went on to become the wealthiest man in California, alongside the Wells Fargo crew, Levi Strauss, and the Studebaker family, who sold wheelbarrows.
If you comb back through the Winklevoss family, you will find a great-grandfather and a great-great-grandfather who knew a thing or two about digging: They worked side by side in the coal mines of Pennsylvania. They didn't go west and they didn't get rich, but maybe the lesson became part of their DNA: Sometimes it's the man who sells the shovels who ends up hitting gold.
Like it or not—and many people don't like it—the Winklevoss brothers are shaping up to be the Samuel Brannans of the bitcoin world.
Nine months after being portrayed in The Social Network, the Winklevoss twins were back out on the water at the World Rowing Cup. CHRISTOPHER LEE/GETTY They heard about it first poolside in Ibiza, Spain. Later it would play into the idea of ease and privilege: umbrella drinks and girls in bikinis. But if the creation myth was going to be flippant, the talk was serious. "I'd say we were cautious, but we were definitely intrigued," says Cameron. They went back home to New York and began to read. There was something about it that got under their skin. "We knew that money had been so broken and inefficient for years," says Tyler, "so bitcoin appealed to us right away."
They speak in braided sentences, catching each other, reassuring themselves, tightening each other's ideas. They don't quite want to say that bitcoin looked like something that might be redemptive—after all, they, like everyone else, were looking to make money, lots of it, Olympic-sized amounts—but they say that it did strike an idealistic chord inside them. They certainly wouldn't be cozying up to the anarchists anytime soon, but this was a global currency that, despite its uncertainties, seemed to present a solution to some of the world's more pressing problems. "It was borderless, instantaneous, irreversible, decentralized, with virtually no transaction costs," says Tyler. It could possibly cut the banks out, and it might even take the knees out from under the credit-card companies. Not only that, but the price, at just under ten dollars per coin, was in their estimation low, very low. They began to snap it up.
They were aware, even at the beginning, that they might, once again, be called Johnny-come-latelys, just hopping blithely on the bandwagon—it was 2012, already four years into the birth of the currency—but they went ahead anyway, power ten. Within a short time they'd spent $11 million buying up a whopping 1 percent of the world's bitcoin, a position they kept up as more bitcoins were mined, making their 1 percent holding today worth about $66 million.
But bitcoin was flammable. The brothers felt the burn quickly. Their next significant investment came later that year, when they gave $1.5 million in venture funding to a nascent exchange called BitInstant. Within a year the CEO was arrested for laundering drug money through the exchange.
So what were a pair of smart, clean-cut Olympic rowers doing hanging around the edges of something so apparently shady, and what, if anything, were they going to do about it?
They mightn't have thought of it this way, but there was something of the sheriff striding into town, the one with the swagger and the scar, glancing up at the balconies as he comes down Main Street, all tumbleweeds and broken pianos. This place was a dump in most people's eyes, but the sheriff glimpsed his last best shot at finally getting the respect he thinks he deserves.
The money shot: A good stroke will catch the water almost without breaking its seal. You stir without rippling. Your silence is sinewy. There's muscle in that calm. The violence catches underneath, thrusts the boat along. Stroke after stroke. Just keep going. Today's truth dies tomorrow. What you have to do is elemental enough. You row without looking behind you. You keep the others in front of you. As long as you can see what they're doing, it's all in your hands. You are there to out-pain them. Doesn't matter who they are, where they come from, how they got here. Know your enemy through yourself. Push through toward pull. Find the still point of this pain. Cut a melody in the disk of your flesh. The only terror comes when they pass you—if they ever pass you.
There are no suits or ties, but there is a white hum in the offices of Gemini in the Flatiron District. The air feels as if it has been brushed clean. There is something so everywhereabout the place. Ergonomic chairs. iPhone portals. Rows of flickering computers. Not so much a hush around the room as a quiet expectation. Eight, nine people. Programmers, analysts, assistants. Other employees—teammates, they call them—dialing in from Portland, Oregon, and beyond.
The brothers fire up the room when they walk inside. A fist-pump here, a shoulder touch there. At the same time, there is something almost shy about them. Apart, they seem like casual visitors to the space they inhabit. It is when they're together that they feel fully shaped. One can't imagine them being apart from each other for very long.
The Winklevoss twins speak onstage at Bitcoin! Let's Cut Through the Noise Already at SXSW in 2016. GETTY They move from desk to desk. The price goes up, the price goes down. The phones ring. The e-mails beep. Customer-service calls. Questions about fees. Inquiries about tax structures.
Gemini was started in late 2015 as a next-generation bitcoin exchange. It is not the first such exchange in the world by any means, but it is one of the most watched. The company is designed with ordinary investors in mind, maybe a hedge fund, maybe a bank: all those people who used to be confused or even terrified by the word bitcoin. It is insured. It is clean. What's so fascinating about this venture is that the brothers are risking themselves by trying to eliminate risk: keeping the boat steady and exploding through it at the same time.
It is when they're together that they feel fully shaped. One can't imagine them being apart from each other for very long. For the past couple years, the Winklevosses have worked closely with just about every compliance agency imaginable. They ticked off all the regulatory boxes. Essentially they wanted to ease all the Debting Thomases. They put regulatory frameworks in place. Security and bankability and insurance were their highest objectives. Nobody was going to be able to blow open the safe. They wanted to soothe all the appetites for risk. They told Bitcoin Magazine they were asking for "permission, not forgiveness."
This is where bitcoin can become normal—that is, if you want bitcoin to be normal.
Just a mile or two down the road, in Soho, a half dozen bitcoiners gather at a meetup. The room is scruffy, small, boxy. A half mannequin is propped on a table, a scarf draped around it. It's the sort of place that twenty years ago would have been full of cigarette smoke. There's a bit of Allen Ginsberg here, a touch of Emma Goldman, a lot of Zuccotti Park. The wine is free and the talk is loose. These are the true believers. They see bitcoin in its clearest possible philosophical terms—the frictionless currency of the people, changing the way people move money around the world, bypassing the banks, disrupting the status quo.
A comedy show is being run out in the backyard. A scruffy young man wanders in and out, announcing over and over again that he is half-baked. A well-dressed Asian girl sidles up to the bar. She looks like she's just stepped out of an NYU business class. She's interested in discovering what bitcoin is. She is regaled by a series of convivial answers. The bartender tells her that bitcoin is a remaking of the prevailing power structures. The girl asks for another glass of wine. The bartender adds that bitcoin is democracy, pure and straight. She nods and tells him that the wine tastes like cooking oil. He laughs and says it wasn't bought with bitcoin. "I don't get it," she says. And so the evening goes, presided over by Margaux Avedisian, who describes herself as the queen of bitcoin. Avedisian, a digital-currency consultant of Armenian descent, is involved in several high-level bitcoin projects. She has appeared in documentaries and on numerous panels. She is smart, sassy, articulate.
When the talk turns to the Winklevoss brothers, the bar turns dark. Someone, somewhere, reaches up to take all the oxygen out of the air. Avedisian leans forward on the counter, her eyes shining, delightful, raged.
"The Winklevii are not the face of bitcoin," she says. "They're jokes. They don't know what they're saying. Nobody in our community respects them. They're so one-note. If you look at their exchange, they have no real volume, they never will. They keep throwing money at different things. Nobody cares. They're not part of us. They're just hangers-on."
"Ah, they're just assholes," the bartender chimes in.
"What they want to do," says Avedisian, "is lobotomize bitcoin, make it into something entirely vapid. They have no clue."
The Asian girl leaves without drinking her third glass of free wine. She's got a totter in her step. She doesn't quite get the future of money, but then again maybe very few in the world do.
Giving testimony on bitcoin licensing before the New York State Department of Financial Services in 2014. LUCAS JACKSON/REUTERS The future of money might look like this: You're standing on Oxford Street in London in winter. You think about how you want to get to Charing Cross Road. The thought triggers itself through electrical signals into the chip embedded in your wrist. Within a moment, a driverless car pulls up on the sensor-equipped road. The door opens. You hop in. The car says hello. You tell it to shut up. It does. It already knows where you want to go. It turns onto Regent Street. You think,A little more air-conditioning, please. The vents blow. You think, Go a little faster, please. The pace picks up. You think, This traffic is too heavy, use Quick(TM). The car swings down Glasshouse Street. You think, Pay the car in front to get out of my way. It does. You think, Unlock access to a shortcut. The car turns down Sherwood Street to Shaftsbury Avenue. You pull in to Charing Cross. You hop out. The car says goodbye. You tell it to shut up again. You run for the train and the computer chip in your wrist pays for the quiet-car ticket for the way home.
All of these transactions—the air-conditioning, the pace, the shortcut, the bribe to get out of the way, the quick lanes, the ride itself, the train, maybe even the "shut up"—will cost money. As far as crypto-currency enthusiasts think, it will be paid for without coins, without phones, without glass screens, just the money coming in and going out of your preprogrammed wallet embedded beneath your skin.
The Winklevosses are betting that the money will be bitcoin. And that those coins will flow through high-end, corporate-run exchanges like Gemini rather than smoky SoHo dives.
Cameron leans across a table in a New York diner, the sort of place where you might want to polish your fork just in case, and says: "The future is here, it's just not evenly distributed yet." He can't remember whom the quote belongs to, but he freely acknowledges that it's not his own. Theirs is a truculent but generous intelligence, capable of surprise and turn at the oddest of moments. They talk meditation, they talk economics, they talk Van Halen, they talk, yes, William Gibson, but everything comes around again to bitcoin.
"The key to all this is that people aren't even going to know that they're using bitcoin," says Tyler. "It's going to be there, but it's not going to be exposed to the end user. Bitcoin is going to be the rails that underpin our payment systems. It's just like an IP address. We don't log on to a series of numbers, 115.425.5 or whatever. No, we log on to Google.com. In the same way, bitcoin is going to be disguised. There will be a body kit that makes it user-friendly. That's what makes bitcoin a kick-ass currency."
Any fool can send a billion dollars across the world—as long as they have it, of course—but it's virtually impossible to send a quarter unless you stick it in an envelope and pay forty-nine cents for a stamp. It's one of the great ironies of our antiquated money system. And yet the quark of the financial world is essentially the small denomination. What bitcoin promises is that it will enable people and businesses to send money in just about any denomination to one another, anywhere in the world, for next to nothing. A public address, a private key, a click of the mouse, and the money is gone.
A Bitcoin conference in New York City in 2014. GETTY This matters. This matters a lot. Credit-card companies can't do this. Neither can the big banks under their current systems. But Marie-Louise on the corner of Libertador Avenue can. And so can Pat Murphy in his Limerick housing estate. So can Mark Andreessen and Bill Gates and Laurene Powell Jobs. Anyone can do it, anywhere in the world, at virtually no charge.
You can do it, in fact, from your phone in a diner in New York. But the whole time they are there—over identical California omelettes that they order with an ironic shrug—they never once open their phones. They come across more like the talkative guys who might buy you a drink at the sports bar than the petulants ordering bottle service in the VIP corner. The older they get, the more comfortable they seem in their contradictions: the competition, the ease; the fame, the quiet; the gamble, the sure thing.
Bitcoin is what might eventually make them among the richest men in America. And yet. There is always a yet. What seems indisputable about the future of money, to the Winklevosses and other bitcoin adherents, is that the technology that underpins bitcoin—the blockchain—will become one of the fundamental tenets of how we deal with the world of finance. Blockchain is the core computer code. It's open source and peer to peer—in other words, it's free and open to you and me. Every single bitcoin transaction ever made goes to an open public ledger. It would take an unprecedented 51 percent attack—where one entity would come to control more than half of the computing power used to mine bitcoin—for hackers to undo it. The blockchain is maintained by computers all around the world, and its future sidechains will create systems that deal with contracts and stock and other payments. These sidechains could very well be the foundation of the new global economy for the big banks, the credit-card companies, and even government itself.
"It's boundless," says Cameron.
This is what the brothers are counting on—and what might eventually make them among the richest men in America.
And yet. There is always a yet.
When you delve into the world of bitcoin, it gets deeper, darker, more mysterious all the time. Why has its creator remained anonymous? Why did he drop off the face of the earth? How much of it does he own himself? Will banks and corporations try to bring the currency down? Why are there really only five developers with full "commit access" to the code (not the Winklevosses, by the way)? Who is really in charge of the currency's governance?
Perhaps the most pressing issue at hand is that of scaling, which has caused what amounts to a civil war among followers. A maximum block size of one megabyte has been imposed on the chain, sort of like a built-in artificial dampener to keep bitcoin punk rock. That's not nearly enough capacity for the number of transactions that would take place in future visions. In years to come, there could be massive backlogs and outages that could create instant financial panic. Bitcoin's most influential leaders are haggling over what will happen. Will bitcoin maintain its decentralized status, or will it go legit and open up to infinite transactions? And if it goes legit, where's the punk?
The issues are ongoing—and they might very well take bitcoin down, but the Winklevosses don't think so. They have seen internal disputes before. They've refrained from taking a public stance mostly because they know that there are a lot of other very smart people in bitcoin who are aware that crisis often builds consensus. "We're in this for the long haul," says Tyler. "We're the first batter in the first inning."
GILLIAN LAUB The waiter comes across and asks them, bizarrely, if they're twins. They nod politely. Who was born first? They've heard it a million times and their answer is always the same: Neither of them—they were born cesarean. Cameron looks older, says the waiter. Tyler grins. Normally it's the other way around, says Cameron, grinning back. Do you ever fight? asks the waiter. Every now and then, they say. But not over this, not over the future.
Heraclitus was wrong. You can, in fact, step in the same river twice. In the beginning you went to the shed. No electricity there, no heat, just a giant tub where you simulated the river. You could only do eleven strokes. But there was something about the repetition, the difference, even the monotony, that hooked you. After a while it wasn't an abandoned shed anymore. College gyms, national training centers. Bigger buildings. High ceilings. AC. Doctors and trainers. Monitors hooked up to your heart, your head, your blood. Six foot five, but even then you were not as tall as the other guys. You liked the notion of underdog. Everyone called you the opposite. The rich kids. The privileged ones. To hell with that. They don't know us, who we are, where we came from. Some of the biggest chips rest on the shoulders of those with the least to lose. Six foot five times two makes just about thirteen feet. You sit in the erg and you stare ahead. Day in, day out. One thousand strokes, two thousand. You work with the very best. You even train with the Navy SEALs. It touches that American part of you. The sentiment, the false optimism. When the oil fields are burning, you even think, I'll go there with them. But you stay in the boat. You want that other flag rising. That's what you aim for. You don't win but you get close. Afterward there are planes, galas, regattas, magazine spreads, but you always come back to that early river. The cold. The fierceness. The heron. Like it or not, you're never going to get off the water—that's just the fact of the matter, it's always going to be there. Hard to admit it, but once you were wrong. You got out of the boat and you haggled over who made it. You lost that one, hard. You might lose this one, too, but then again it just might be the original arc that you're stepping toward. So you return, then. You rise before dark. You drag your carcass along Broadway before dawn.
All the rich men in the world want to get shot into outer space. Richard Branson. Jeff Bezos. Elon Musk. The new explorers. To get the hell out of here and see if they—and maybe we—can exist somewhere else for a while. It's the story of the century. We want to know if the pocket of the universe can be turned inside out. We're either going to bring all the detritus of the world upward with us or we're going to find a brand-new way to exist. The cynical say that it's just another form of colonization—they're probably right, but then again maybe it's our only way out.
The Winklevosses have booked their tickets—numbers 700 and 701—on Branson's Virgin Galactic. Although they go virtually everywhere together, the twins want to go on different flights because of the risk involved: Now that they're in their mid-thirties, they can finally see death, or at least its rumor. It's a boy's adventure, but it's also the outer edge of possibility. It cost a quarter of a million dollars per seat, and they paid for it, yes, in bitcoin.
Of course, up until recently, the original space flights all splashed down into the sea. One of the ships that hauled the Gemini space capsule out of the water in 1965 was the Intrepid aircraft carrier.
The Winklevosses no longer pull their boat up the river. Instead they often run five miles along the Hudson to the Intrepid and back. The destroyer has been parked along Manhattan's West Side for almost as long as they have been alive. It's now a museum. The brothers like the boat, its presence, its symbolism: Intrepid, Gemini, the space shot.
They ease into the run.
submitted by thegrandknight to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Here's why you shouldn't believe 'safe haven' claims about Bitcoin

The sharp rise and subsequent fall in Bitcoin’s value places it among the greatest market bubbles in history. It has outpaced the 17th-century tulip mania, the South Sea bubble of 1720, and the more recent Japanese asset price and dot-com bubbles.
The rapid price rise garnered attention from an increasing number of academics and investment advisers. Some have suggested that Bitcoin improves portfolio performance and can even be used as a potential “safe haven” asset in place of gold.
Our work finds that much of this research is flawed and overlooks some important attributes that any investor should consider before allocating funds to such a speculative investment.
This is particularly relevant if investing in Bitcoin is rationalised as a prospective safe haven in times of market turmoil.

Hard to value

The first attribute investors consider is how to value Bitcoin. Typically, assets are valued based on the cash flows they produce. Bitcoin lacks this property.
This leads to ongoing debate as to the true value of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. Some, such as the Winklevoss twins and other Bitcoin entrepreneurs, believe the price will soar far higher. Others, including Nobel prize winner Eugene Fama and esteemed investor Warren Buffett, believe the real value is closer to zero. Another Nobel winner, Robert Shiller, suggests the correct answer is “ambiguous”.
There is even wide variation in price across the various Bitcoin exchanges. This is common in fragmented markets and makes it difficult for an investor to find the best market price at any point in time – a process called price discovery.

High price volatility

Bitcoin prices also have a high level of variation (volatility) when compared to other possible investments including bonds, stocks and gold. Even tech stocks such as Twitter, which are considered relatively volatile, are found to have less price variation. This adds to the difficulty investors face when trying to value Bitcoin and any portfolios that contain it.
This is of particular concern given the large daily losses that Bitcoin has experienced in its relatively short life. The largest one-day decline experienced by the popular S&P500 index since 2011 is 4.2%. Bitcoin has had nearly 200 days that were worse (and over 60 days worse than the biggest decline in the gold price of 10.2%).
Put another way, Bitcoin has had 200 days worse than the worst day on the stock market. This hardly seems like an enticing investment for most.

Low liquidity

Investors should also consider the ease with which they are able to buy and sell any assets in which they invest. One method used to measure this liquidity attribute is the bid-ask spread – the difference in the price at which one is able to buy and sell the asset.
More liquid assets have a narrow bid-ask spread. Bitcoin’s bid-ask spread varies from one exchange to another, but in general it is much larger than for other assets.
While bid-ask spreads provide one measure of implicit trading costs, investors also consider the explicit transaction fees they are charged when trading. Transaction fees for trading traditional investments are typically well known and have trended down over time.
While Bitcoin fees have recently declined, they have proven to be highly variable, ranging from over $30 to under $1. The time taken to process a transaction can also be greater than 78 minutes. This is much longer than for stocks or bonds and creates another layer of uncertainty for investors.

Only for the most risk-loving

Bitcoin is harder to value, more volatile, less liquid, and costlier to transact than other assets in normal market conditions. Potential investors should be wary and carefully consider whether such highly speculative assets are appropriate additions to any portfolio.
Given safe havens are typically in demand during financial crisis, when markets are more volatile and less liquid, it is highly unlikely that Bitcoin is even worth considering as a safe-haven asset.
submitted by cryptomastr to CryptoGuard [link] [comments]

The Winklevoss Twins Discuss Facebook, Bitcoin, Successes, and more on Keenan LIVE! Winklevoss twins first Bitcoin billionaires Bitcoin Bulls And Facebook Founders Winklevoss Twins Explain Why Bitcoin Will Make People Rich BTC Price After MASS ADOPTION  What is Mimblewimble? Winklevoss Twins Bitcoin News Gemini's Winklevoss Twins Sue Charlie Shrem Over 5,000 Bitcoin ($32 Million) - Nov 2nd Crypto News

The Winklevoss twins are the world’s first bitcoin billionaires. The twins have invested and reaped a 10,000 per cent rise in the cryptocurrency. If we are right about using a gold framework to value bitcoin, and bitcoin continues on this path, then the bull case scenario for bitcoin is that it is undervalued by a multiple of 45. Said differently, the price of bitcoin could appreciate 45x from where it is today, which means we could see a price of $500,000 U.S. dollars per bitcoin. As you probably already know, the recent rise in bitcoin value is remarkable – the cryptocurrency has topped $10,000. This means that a few people have already become the first billionaires from bitcoin in vestments in history. Among the few names that almost certainly achieved this are Cameron Winklevoss and his twin brother Tyler. Cameron Winklevoss, the co-founder of Gemini, believes not owning Bitcoin is a “worse decision” than not investing in Amazon. Since the early days, Amazon stock has increased from around $250 ... The Winklevoss twins are the subject of Ben Mezrich’s new book, Bitcoin Billionaires. / Getty Images My journey to Bitcoin Billionaires began more than 11 years ago, with a strange little email ...

[index] [8342] [21316] [27793] [25341] [1663] [16689] [27100] [14635] [24341] [31253]

The Winklevoss Twins Discuss Facebook, Bitcoin, Successes, and more on Keenan LIVE!

Winklevoss Twins: Bitcoin Could Go Beyond One Trillion Market Cap + Gemini ... Mark Zuckerberg supports universal basic income and Bitcoin value at an all-time high ... History Help ... This Twins Bros Created A History According To Telegraph.co.uk web Check Out Video About Secret Behind It How Much They Invested How they became Bitcoin Tycoon - A Big Players. The Winklevoss Twins Discuss Facebook, Bitcoin, Successes, and more on Keenan LIVE! ... How the Heck Do You Value a Bitcoin?! (w/ Raoul Pal) - Duration: ... History Help About; Press ... In this interview, I talk to Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, co-founders of Gemini. We discuss The Social Network, Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg, how they discovered Bitcoin, regulations and the role ... According to the New York Times, the lawsuit claims, that Shrem stole 5,000 Bitcoin from the Winklevoss twins, which would now be worth around $32 million.

#